Recruiters: Are You Going Beyond the Call of Duty?

Last week, a group of recruiters and I were talking about some of the things we do to help our candidates make it through the interview process. We discussed tips, resume restructuring, and coaching. Some of us had success stories about how their tips helped a candidate land an offer. But I asked them: what about the candidates that didn’t make it through the interview process? What about the candidates that weren’t a fit from the start? Are we doing anything to help those candidates?

Maybe I’m overly empathetic, but I really identify with the job seekers and their daily struggles to find work. I’ve been the underemployed before. I’ve been unemployed. I’ve also been the employee that felt like my abilities were not being recognized or utilized for the benefit of the company. And even though I’ve been involved in Human Resources and talent acquisition, that advantage didn’t always help me when it came to securing my next job. Even with the knowledge of knowing what recruiters and hiring managers looked for, I still struggled. If I struggled, I can only imagine what it is like for people who don’t understand the recruitment processes or tricks of the trade.

As a recruiter or talent acquisition specialist, have you ever spoken to a candidate that you knew wasn’t going to be a fit for your job opening? Or have you talked to a candidate that had potential but needed some extra guidance? In those instances, what did you do? Did you simply send a rejection letter or pass them through the hiring process knowing that they might be rejected due to the areas that needed coaching? Or did you act like a consultant? Did you go above the call of duty and make it your job to help the candidate be employable and attractive to other employers even though you couldn’t offer a job?

I know that not all recruiters have time to do this. We’re overwhelmed and most of the time we don’t even have a second to breathe. But I often try to help out candidates as much as I can. I’ll give them tips on their resume, let them know what recruiters look for, coach them on their interviewing skills, tell them how to be easily found by recruiters, and so on. Most importantly, I let them know that they are always welcome to call me or email me if they need help or have questions. That extra time and effort feels rewarding especially when you hear the appreciation in the job seeker’s voice. I love it when I get emails and calls down the line from these individuals asking me for advice or when they let me know that they landed a job because of the tips I provided.

I remember wishing that someone saw the potential in me when I was a job seeker. I hoped that employers could see my passion and hear the conviction in my voice when I told them that I wanted to do great things for their company. Eventually, a company saw that and took a chance on me. Now, I want to be the person that returns that favor, even if I can’t initially provide a job to these candidates who honestly want a future for themselves. Maybe my assistance will help them get the interview they needed so they can sit in front of that specific manager who will see their intentions and give them a chance.

It shouldn’t just be about YOUR job opening that you need to fill. It should be about helping people get back to work. People have unnecessarily suffered the situations caused by the changes in the workforce. What are we doing to help them adjust?

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Helping our Veterans Enter the Civilian Workforce

Just in time for Veteran’s Day! #Tchat hosted a great discussion last week in regard to helping veterans enter into the civilian workforce. Once again, the contributors had some great suggestions on how we can help veterans prepare for job hunting, gain transferable skills, and format their resume so it can be easily read by recruiters in civilian companies. I was happy to see the passion that these recruiters and human resources professionals had for helping the veterans get where they need to be when it came to landing a job.

Here are some great take-aways and suggestions from this chat:

  • It would be wise for military branches to take a few months to properly prepare the veterans for the change between military life and civilian life. This includes helping them build necessary skills that will transfer into civilian work.
  • RPOs, organizations, and staffing firms should take the time to partner with military branches and prepare available jobs for transitioning veterans.
  • Veterans should seek help when it comes to gaining appropriate interviewing skills, job hunting skills, and resume writing skills. Companies should be open to helping them with this, even if it’s as simple as helping them reformat their resumes so they will have appropriate keywords that recruiters look for.
  • Veterans should be taught how to build on their networking skills.
  • Veterans should be educated on how to create a personal brand that they can use in face-to-face networking events, interviews, and even social media branding.
  • Companies and veterans need to take the time to collaborate and bridge the gap between military verbiage and civilian business language so they can have equally understandable communication with clear messages.
  • For mentoring and coaching opportunities, companies should pair new veteran employees with others who have made the transition in the past.
  • Companies should make special efforts to seek out veterans, help them become aware of job openings they could be a fit for, and create social opportunities to discuss how the job and candidate would be a fit.

There were so many great ideas in this chat that I simply could not name them all. We all hoped that these suggestions were inspiring and hopefully had started a helpful trend in this respect. You may review more of the suggestions, the recap, and additional tweets on this subject below.

If you are interested in topics like this, be sure to join #TChat on Twitter- Wednesdays at 7pm EST

More links:

Employing our Veterans by Meghan M. Biro

Smart Mission- Hire Vets by Kathleen Kruse

Recap Slide Show

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