Hate Your Résumé? Learn From My Mistakes

Hating your résumé is a terrible feeling. Believe me, I’ve been there. My first post-college résumé was a document that was almost personified by how much I loathed it. It was free of typos and used proper grammar. It met all of the standard requirements of what a résumé is supposed to be. So what was the problem?

Simply put, it wasn’t me. It was devoid of all of the qualities that made me special, all of the details that made me a great hire. I had a résumé that did not yet reflect professional experience in my field and looked like a template. There was nothing on that piece of paper that said “you need to hire this person.”

As a recent graduate, my lack of experience was common. However, just because I was new to the professional landscape didn’t mean that I didn’t have other experience. My mistake was that while trying to make the résumé look neat and professional I stripped away all of the important things.

There were no keywords to help HR software find my résumé. Not getting the résumé into someone’s hands is a crucial error. Even if a résumé is stellar, it will do no good if no one sees it. My résumé also failed the six-second test. If a recruiter or HR manager looked at it for just six seconds, it would almost certainly go into the reject pile.

My terrible first professional résumé ended up being a huge lesson in what not to do. Here are some of the biggest lessons I learned from the experience:

  • Optimize for keywords: the first step in the job-search process is getting your resume into someone’s hands. Most companies use some sort of applicant tracking system to sort through potential candidates before deciding who to call for an interview. If you tailor your resume to feature keywords mentioned in the job posting, you are more likely to have your résumé picked up.
  • Highlight your skills: don’t rely solely on keywords to make your résumé shine. Take time to showcase your specific achievements and abilities. The skills that the job posting doesn’t mention could still help get you hired. Think of it this way, the applicant tracking system pulls résumés based on keywords and similar factors. This means all of the potential interviewees probably used the same keywords as you did. Highlighting other noteworthy skills or accomplishments can help you stand out from the stack of applicants.
  • One size does not fit all: every résumé should be tailored to a specific job with a specific company. No exceptions! It may be tempting to send the same résumé to 15 companies rather than taking the time to tailor it for 5 specific companies, but this is not the most effective strategy. The time that you spend personalizing the résumé will help make it easier for you to get results.
  • Include a personalized cover letter: this may be a polarizing topic, as some recruiters dismiss the importance of cover letters. For me, however, a strong cover letter is a must-have. In fact, it was my cover letter that got me in the door for my first post-college job despite my sub-par résumé. A cover letter gives you more freedom to be yourself and really connect to the hiring manager.

Your résumé should be as strong on paper as you are in real life. Whether you are fresh out of college or have over a decade of experience, your résumé should be tailored to suit the specific job and highlight your experience and skill-sets.

I didn’t know better when I wrote that first résumé, but I do now. An over-formatted piece of paper that lacks any real sense of your abilities will not improve your chance of getting a job. If you can’t seem to fix the problems on your own, there are professional services that can create your ideal résumé for you.

Don’t hurt your chances of being hired by sending out a résumé you hate. Creating something that you are proud of can help you land an interview and even increase your chances of being hired. When making your résumé, be yourself and be smart. You have what it takes to get hired, all you have to do is show them why.

 

erin_palmerThis guest post was provided by Erin Palmer. Erin is a writer and editor who covers topics found in the Masters Degree in HR online programs for the University Alliance. Learn about human resources careers such as HR manager and other career information at villanovau.com. Feel free to connect with Erin on Twitter: @Erin_E_Palmer

 

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Do You Show Your Employees Appreciation?

Many employers are still feeling the strain of the economy crash and as a result, have to be tight on their money and resources. Unfortunately, because of this situation, the employers feel like they can’t properly compensate their hard working employees in the way they generously have in the past. However, although they can’t necessarily afford bonuses, promotions, or fancy rewards like they may have been able to previously, there are still ways to show your employees that they are appreciated. These simple options could easily increase the morale of your employees.

Here are some ideas to show your employees that you appreciate their efforts:

  • Give praise: let your employees know that you’re taking the time to notice their individual efforts. Give them praise for things they personally have done well in.
  • Share with others: it can make your employee feel good if you share your appreciation for them with others.
  • Say thank you: whether it is their duty or not, it’s always nice to receive a simple “thank you.”
  • Take a load off: maybe you can’t afford to give your employees a free day of PTO but you can always help lighten their load. For example, for an employee that put in exceptional work: delegate some of their tasks to others or take on some tasks yourself. Giving your employee an easy, light day can really make a difference in an employee’s day.
  • Set up an event: once again, maybe you can’t have a huge, paid-for event for your employees, but you can still do something for them. Set up times to do an inter-office potluck so employees can take a break at work, enjoy good food, and mingle with others. A small social event like that could increase happiness within the workplace.
  • Write a handwritten letter note: recently, I received handwritten card from my manager to let me know she appreciates all my hard work. It was a simple thing but knowing that she took the time to write a personal note to me really meant a lot to me.
  • Provide opportunity: promotions might not be an option right now but employees still will appreciate the opportunity for professional development. Give employees the opportunity to network with others in the company, to shadow for jobs they’re interested in, or to do different training/development workshops.

It’s simple but yet it still is effective. Employees will appreciate the effort you take to make them feel appreciated. You would be surprised at how it increases a positive environment and morale.

Links:

Employee Appreciation

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Getting Connected: Networking Communities

In past blog postings, I have written about topics involving social media communities and talent communities. Of course, I am very passionate about both of these types of communities but the main reason behind my feelings towards it is what these communities offer. If individuals get involved in these types of situations, many will be happy to find that the communities offer some incredible networking opportunities. Not only do they offer networking opportunities but they can also be a great resource for learning, development, and thought leadership. So, what can networking communities do for you?

Here are some potential networking communities you can explore:

  • Networking groups: Recently I discovered the website www.meetup.com. It’s a great way for people to discover specific groups who are meeting up in your area. There are plenty of groups meeting up for specific reasons, whether it is for business, certain interests, or generally just to meet people.
  • Professional clubs: professional groups that meet regularly are also a good way to network with people in different industries. For example, in Charleston, SC there is a professional club called the Charleston Young Professionals. They typically set up monthly events to allow people to have fun and also mingle for business contacts.
  • Social media: websites like Linkedin and Twitter are fantastic ways to connect with individuals. Discussion groups and chats that are based on specific professions, topics, or industries can also make it easy to casually connect with individuals.
  • Work events: surprisingly, work events can also be a great place to network. Sometimes in office settings people don’t have the time or ability to talk to people outside of their department or to individuals they don’t directly work with. This can be a great way to get to know about others in your company.
  • Conventions: conventions are a way to meet people who are in a specific industry or specific role. This will allow you to connect with people that could potentially be in the same industry/role as you. Therefore, it may be a quick way to form a bond.

Some of the benefits of networking:

  • Business connections: networking with individuals can help you find business connections that can assist you with specific business needs or business development.
  • Learning and development: networks can help open up opportunities to learn and develop. For example, social communities can present online learning, training, and development opportunities for those who want to extend their learning outside of what their company can offer.
  • Resources: networking can help you discover some really interesting resources. For example, when I was starting my blog I came across some useful reference material that helped me add something extra to my posts. It’s also a great way for people to discover job opportunities or companies that they may never have heard of.
  • Thought Leadership: networking groups can promote discussion, which can ultimately promote thought leadership. I’ve witnessed occurrences where a simple group discussion resulted in a solution that helped better a business and situation.

Since I’ve been networking in some of the ways mentioned above, I feel like I’ve developed greatly as a person. I could almost kick myself for not partaking in this sooner. The individuals I’ve met have been unbelievably inspiring and have helped pave the way to build my knowledge to grow personally and professionally. Being involved in networking communities has been one of the greatest decisions I’ve made. How about you?

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Are you a Good Coach to Your Employees?

Recently, I had the pleasure to discuss some human resources, management, and leadership topics with Nick Sarillo, founder and CEO of Nick’s Pizza and Pub. He initially reached out to me regarding my passion for company culture and engagement and conversation took off from there. I absolutely loved his outlook on how he manages his employees and he even was kind enough to share some links to articles discussing this. Today’s blog post will discuss one of Nick’s qualities in terms of management: managers should be coaches.

I think many of us can remember back when we first entered the workforce and were simply trying to figure out how to gain the skills to be successful at our jobs. I’m sure we’ve all had the situations where a boss or manager were maybe a little too harsh, too impatient, or too judgmental when it came to a task we hadn’t quite mastered yet. I know that myself and many others would feel a bit deflated in these types of situations and maybe even had a sense of doubt of whether or not we’d ever get it down. Even if you aren’t a new employee and have been working for several years, these types of situations still can arise. But what can managers do to make it better?

Nick had told me about how he coaches his employees and manages them by “trusting and tracking.”  He decided that the best way to help engage his employees is by training them thoroughly and giving them all the necessary skills and knowledge they need to perform a job duty. From there, he stands back, let’s them take charge and be accountable for the results. He noticed that this method had helped employees take pride in their work and actually take more initiative when it comes to their growth and development.

Nick built on this method, taking the time to update his training and then allowing his employees the space to develop their roles. Although Nick trusted his employees to progress, he still made sure he monitored them to help them in areas that they were struggling in. Even if he needed to step in, he still made sure the feedback was positive to allow the learning and training experience be a good one for his employees. Some tips that Nick suggested in regard to this are:

  • Make sure you are not giving constant orders and criticism.
  • Offer training, coaching, support, and positive reinforcement.
  • Build training systems into your company and management.
  • Provide helpful feedback on a regular basis.
  • Make expectations clear, track progress, celebrate met goals, and give help when needed.

I was very inspired by this management style and was happy to hear that Nick stuck with it even though other business owners (including his own father) told him he was crazy. This style has helped Nick’s business become one of the top 10 independent pizza companies in the United States. Moreover, Nick has some of the lowest turnover found in this industry.

Nick Sarillo is the founder and CEO of Nick’s Pizza & Pub in Crystal Lake and Elgin, Ill., and the author of A Slice of the Pie: How to Build a Big Little Business (Portfolio; hardcover). www.nicksarillo.com.

More Links:

Bosses Should be Coaches not Cops

Nick Sarillo’s book, “A Slice of the Pie” on Amazon.com

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Helping our Veterans Enter the Civilian Workforce

Just in time for Veteran’s Day! #Tchat hosted a great discussion last week in regard to helping veterans enter into the civilian workforce. Once again, the contributors had some great suggestions on how we can help veterans prepare for job hunting, gain transferable skills, and format their resume so it can be easily read by recruiters in civilian companies. I was happy to see the passion that these recruiters and human resources professionals had for helping the veterans get where they need to be when it came to landing a job.

Here are some great take-aways and suggestions from this chat:

  • It would be wise for military branches to take a few months to properly prepare the veterans for the change between military life and civilian life. This includes helping them build necessary skills that will transfer into civilian work.
  • RPOs, organizations, and staffing firms should take the time to partner with military branches and prepare available jobs for transitioning veterans.
  • Veterans should seek help when it comes to gaining appropriate interviewing skills, job hunting skills, and resume writing skills. Companies should be open to helping them with this, even if it’s as simple as helping them reformat their resumes so they will have appropriate keywords that recruiters look for.
  • Veterans should be taught how to build on their networking skills.
  • Veterans should be educated on how to create a personal brand that they can use in face-to-face networking events, interviews, and even social media branding.
  • Companies and veterans need to take the time to collaborate and bridge the gap between military verbiage and civilian business language so they can have equally understandable communication with clear messages.
  • For mentoring and coaching opportunities, companies should pair new veteran employees with others who have made the transition in the past.
  • Companies should make special efforts to seek out veterans, help them become aware of job openings they could be a fit for, and create social opportunities to discuss how the job and candidate would be a fit.

There were so many great ideas in this chat that I simply could not name them all. We all hoped that these suggestions were inspiring and hopefully had started a helpful trend in this respect. You may review more of the suggestions, the recap, and additional tweets on this subject below.

If you are interested in topics like this, be sure to join #TChat on Twitter- Wednesdays at 7pm EST

More links:

Employing our Veterans by Meghan M. Biro

Smart Mission- Hire Vets by Kathleen Kruse

Recap Slide Show

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Investing in Your Employees’ Learning and Development

Throughout my career, I have taken notice of the efforts that my employers had attempted in order to train and hopefully develop new employees. I’ve also participated in continuous training and workshops as a refresher on the knowledge and skills I had gained throughout my employment at the company. Although I find all of this very important for your employees and your workforce as a whole, I can’t help to wonder if there are additional opportunities that employers are offering their employees. Are employers investing in the employees’ futures, as well?

One of the most inspiring things I have researched was the fact that some employers truly take notice to what their employees’ natural talents are or what their goals are for the future. Some employers also even help present opportunities that will allow employees to gain the skills they need to get where they want to be. But, these types of situations only really occur if an employer somehow takes the time to discover these additional talents or if the employees actually speak up to say what they really want to accomplish while employed there. But what if we tried to do things differently? What if we gave all employees the chance to be open and voice what they want as part of their learning and development? It seems as if though the training that the employees are involved in help them become experts at what they’re currently doing but doesn’t really offer them the ability to expand beyond that.

Call me crazy but I would love it if employers took the time to ask their employees what their career paths were and what type of training they would like to partake in. Give them the empowerment and options to pick what training they need and assist them in getting it. Investing in your employees this way can not only increase engagement, but could also increase loyalty and could even help your organization progress in ways it never could before. You are giving them the ability and the tools to help them be a super-asset for your company.

Too often, I hear employees leave companies because they feel like they have nowhere to go and no chances to grow as a professional and/or personally. So they venture elsewhere looking for the ability to learn and grow. I suppose that this post is more of me thinking out loud because I know that there is much more that is involved when it comes to L&D. Regardless,  I would be impressed to see that employers are giving their employees the options to pave the way to their future within the organization. I would also love to see employees take these chances and see how much it changes them.

Food for thought.

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Employee Engagement for a Lifetime

With Baby Boomers heading out and Gen Y heading in, companies are starting to feel the pain of the generational differences in the workplace. Baby Boomers are known to be the loyal generation and would typically stick with their employer for many years, if not their lifetime. Gen Y seems to have a different plan in mind in the sense that they’re looking for a job that is meaningful and a company that has a culture that matches their personal values. In the pursuit to find these ideal employers, it has been a common practice for this generation of employees to leave their employers within the first two years. So how can you increase employee engagement to create a sense of loyalty? Simple—you must brand your company.

Typically, when people think of company branding they figure it has to do with attracting customers, shareholders, and investors. But it shouldn’t stop there. Your employees are your biggest asset and in order to retain their talent, you must brand your company to increase employee engagement. Below are some reasons on why internal branding could benefit your company:

  • Your employees will become your megaphone: I’m sure you’ve heard that word-of-mouth is your best referral/advertising campaign. Consider your employees as free advertisement for your company. Give them a good or bad experience, and they’ll be blasting that information all over social media, telling their friends/family, and so on. How will what they say affect your business? Give them a good experience and they’ll be sure to tell others about it.
  • Allow your employees to be internal brand ambassadors: It is extremely hard to fake conviction. Therefore, if you have employees meeting new hires, it is important to have them meet the individuals that truly love and believe in your company to really get your new hires excited about working there. Setting that first impression is key in employee retention.
  • Make an investment to get a great ROI: Investing in your employees is very important. Your employees want to feel like they matter, that they’re being heard, and that they have a future in your company. This investment will make them truly respect you, want to be dedicated to you, and want to work hard so you’re proud of them. This loyalty and dedication can be a good way to retain employees long-term.
  • Branding leads to employee engagement: Employee engagement is one of the hardest things for HR professionals to master in their organizations. However, if you create a brand that gets your employees excited to work for you, then engagement will come naturally. Employee engagement can increase levels of motivation, productivity, empowerment, accountability, and responsibility.

Company branding should be more than just the external. It should also seriously focus on the internal. After all, your employees are everything. They help you progress, innovate, and be successful. If you aren’t able to successfully and effectively brand in a way to attract and retain talent, then you may have issues down the line.

 

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The Social Community for Talent Acquisition

Last Wednesday’s #TChat had once again explored one of my favorite topics: social media uses for talent acquisition needs.  With a mix of social media community managers, recruiters, human resources professionals, and job seekers- the contributions presented were amazing. Contributors shed some great light on how social media can reach a huge audience, how HR professionals have started to utilize it for their recruiting needs, and how job seekers are starting to realize that their social media presence could be a great resource for landing a job. I’m a strong believer in this because this method was one of the ways I not only found a job, but also an internship and many other fantastic opportunities to network with HR professionals. So, today’s blog will be a recap on what we discussed.

Community managers don’t just have the task of marketing to their communities but they also need to be the brand ambassadors, the personality, the customer service, the voice, and the conversationalists. Not only do they put out information but they can also learn from the customers and fans who are interested in the company and brand. They help get people engaged and stay in-the-know in real time. They create humanization and create transparency for your company culture and vision. They are the cheerleaders that spread their conviction for the brand so much, that customers/fans will pick up on the excitement and energy and also spread the word. Most importantly, they are a huge part of helping a company gain and retain customers and even potential talent.

So how can community managers help in the talent acquisition and recruiting world? Community managers not only promote the company and its products/services, it also promotes the company’s culture, vision, and why they are amazing- aka they promote themselves as being a great employer which can really pique job seekers’ interests. Some pros of social communities for talent acquisition purposes:

  • Helps job seekers learn about companies and positions
  • Helps job seekers learn about company culture to compare against their personal values
  • Helps engage potential job seekers
  • Helps job seekers have questions answered before deciding to apply
  • Reaches a larger audience of job seekers
  • Helps recruiters find candidates in an unorthodox way
  • Helps recruiters see what candidates can offer to their company
  • Helps recruiters see beyond a candidate’s resume

 

I can’t help but respect community managers because their job is jam packed with different duties. Not only do they need to market and promote the company’s products and services, but they also need to market the employer brand. They need to respond and communicate with their people to really create a solid community to gain, retain, and keep customer/fan/candidate loyalty. Additionally, they need to be the eyes and ears of the company- they have to gather intel and feedback based on what their customers and candidates are asking for. And most importantly, they must respond in a way that will keep the brand alive and well.

 

If you enjoy topics like this, be sure to participate in #TChat on Twitter- Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

More links:

#TChat Recap by Kathleen Kruse

Some Top Tweets about this topic

Talent Culture

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Bitrix24: Social Workplace Collaboration Made Easy

 

Recently, an employee of Bitrix24 had reached out to me in regard to their social workplace collaboration platform. Of course, I was intrigued by this because I find these types of tools to be fascinating. Over the past couple years, I have been researching, testing, or using different SaaS to see how it can help organizations be more efficient. Naturally, I wanted to hear more about this and learn about the features it can offer an organization. Stephen Ankenman of Bitrix, Inc. was kind enough to speak with me in regard to their concept.

Ashley Perez (AP): What is the core concept of Bitrix24 and why did you decide to develop this idea?

Stephen Ankenman (SA): “Small businesses need classic intranet tools and social collaboration just like enterprises. Our driving philosophy is to unite the management of a company to a single platform that can handle all standard company operations: vertical and horizontal, internal and external.”

AP: What are some key features that help employees collaborate and coordinate more effectively?

SA: “Content can be shared instantly to any subset of users, whether it is a comment or file. Internal notifications, automatic reporting, and the activity stream replace a lot of email and greatly reduce the need to repeat information. For some companies, simply having anywhere, anytime access to files, tasks, and other data is a game-changer. There are also Business Processes available in the CRM and file library which can draw on other parts of the intranet, such as the company structure, instant notifications, and tasks to keep operations running smoothly.”

 AP: How does this SaaS help all levels of employees communicate and socialize?

SA: “The Activity Stream keeps users informed of everything that pertains to them and provides commenting and other methods of instant feedback (public or private). The social layer of Bitrix24 provides discussion threads directly attached to objects such as tasks and files, and spontaneous conversations can be started, shared, and enhanced with new files, pictures and videos.”

 AP: How has this helped project management?

SA: “Any number of project groups can be formed. Tasks inside groups can be viewed as a Gantt chart and are visible to all users.  With a group-only activity stream on the front page, it’s very easy to get a snapshot of what is going on.”

AP: What are the different features that help employees navigate to find relevant documents, knowledge-base, information, and resources?

SA: “ Search is very powerful in Bitrix24.  Search covers file content, comments, tasks, wiki entries, the CRM and other objects. It’s important to note that simply having all of these objects under one roof provides a distinct advantage for Bitrix24’s search.”

AP: Is Bitrix24 flexible and mobile? If so, please explain.

SA: “Bitrix24’s CRM is highly customizable to reflect products, sales stages, contact types, and all other nuances that are unique to each company’s sales process. In the intranet side, the access system lets you share what you want how you want and with whom you want.

“Business processes, available in the CRM and document library, allow highly specific workflows to be created according to the very specific needs of a company concerning approvals, conditions, and drawing in information at various stages of the workflow.”

Recently, I spoke with an individual, Jim Sweeney, who had started using Bitrix24 for his start-up company’s needs. As he had stated, “I’ve used other platforms before that seemed much more entailed and weren’t really necessary for smaller companies and start-ups like my own.  Bitrix24 helps with communication, organization, and project management. It’s simplified and user friendly so it’s very easy to find the information that you’re looking for. It helps organize each person in our group so we can clearly see what the next milestone is and what the next due date is. It helps us easily link our tasks to our process mapping.

“I can see it being really great for project management, and is especially good for inter-office communication. This is extremely helpful because all of the team members of my company is scattered throughout the country. The communication features are so clear and easy to use that we can get straight to the point rather than having to mess around with customization features.

“The selling point for this platform over larger platforms is the pricing (it makes it easy for small start-ups) and that its simple- I don’t need all the features that larger organizations need. It works for us. There is a very small learning-curve. For smaller companies, we don’t have time to waste on trying to learn every aspect of a platform. We’re more concerned about getting our product/service up and running. Bitrix24 takes away the hassle and allows us to get to what matters.”

After speaking with Stephen about Bitrix24 and also hearing some real, customer feedback, I’d have to say I’m impressed with this. Sometimes having too many customization features can be daunting, confusing, and can actually slow down productivity. I like the fact that Bitrix24 allows companies and users to get straight to the point and makes using the SaaS a lot easier.

If you’re interested in learning more about this company, please feel free to go to www.bitrix24.com

Can HR Upgrade to 2.0?

This past Wednesday’s #TChat was quite an interesting one. Of course, I loved it because it dealt with Human Resources, technology, and keeping up with the fast-paced business changes. Apparently, though, I wasn’t the only one who found this topic thought-provoking. 340 contributors on Twitter had taken the time to participate in our hour long chat which had resulted in 2,100 tweets and 11.7 million impressions. I definitely want to say thank you to those who contributed- your offerings made the chat one of the most enjoyable ones to date. And of course, you have helped spark ideas for today’s blog posting: why HR sometimes seems to lag during fast business changes.

Can HR be agile like the rest of business? Sure they can be, but their purpose is much more complex than that and being agile could potentially prevent them from doing their proper due diligence. Human Resources are there to protect the company and also the employees. They must edit their plan of action to not only protect them presently, but also in the future. This involves careful planning. With every organizational change, HR needs to consider and update the following:

  • Job descriptions: sometimes these organizational changes can also change the roles of the employees. This means HR needs to reconsider the descriptions, duties, and expectations for these new roles.
  • Compensation Benchmarking: HR now needs to consider and compare the new roles against others in the industry. They must ensure that they are now compensating employees properly to be competitive.
  • Career path planning: HR may need to restructure some of the paths that these new roles will lead up to. After all, they wouldn’t want to create a job that ends there with no room to move upwards or laterally. That could ruin their efforts of retaining talent.
  • Performance reviews: new criterion and expectations need to be created to ensure that employees are meeting the requirements satisfactorily. This means that management and HR need to create new objectives to ensure that the role is progressing appropriately for business needs.
  • Recruitment efforts and assessments: recruiters will now need to know what the new profile and basic requirements are to help them discover the best talent. New assessments will have to be created to help recruiters determine that candidates have the appropriate skills and knowledge to perform well at the new role.
  • Employer branding: HR needs to determine what marketing and branding efforts will need to be restructured to ensure they are presenting the company in a way that is aligned with the new changes. These efforts need to be carefully thought out to appropriately attract new talent and retain current talent.

Some individuals may question why HR can’t keep up with “the speed of business”, especially with new technology emerging. Yes- technology has helped HR exponentially. However, a lot of the functions above require a “human” touch to review, plan, and consider long-term effects. HR is the department that keeps the organization and workforce ecosystem steady. Therefore, their role in organizational changes may be a little bit slower, but overall, their efforts make more of a difference than some may realize.

If you like topics like this, be sure to join #TChat on Twitter – Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

More links to this week’s chat:

HR Shifts to the Fast Lane by Kathleen Kruse

#TChat Storify by Sean Charles

5 Ways to Rock Star HR Leadership by Meghan M. Biro

Talent Culture

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