Humanize Your Brand

It’s important to humanize your brand, whether you are branding yourself, consumer-based things, your corporation, or your employer brand. In the past, we would market our brands via content that was pushed out to the audience. More often than not, this marketing strategy limited communication to a one-way scenario: from brand to audience. As technology and social media have become more predominate in the world, marketing and branding have taken on a life of their own, and it seems as if though some of the best brands out there are the ones that open up two-way opportunities.

Some companies and individuals have failed to realize that social media shouldn’t just be a way to push out information and content. Yes, it’s a great way to promote those things but it shouldn’t continually post enough to be considered “spam-worthy.” Your brand also needs to have some personal touches to it. It needs to have a personality. It needs to be social. It needs to listen. And most importantly: your brand needs to reflect the way you “live” and vice versa.

I think some of the best companies and people that humanize their brands well are the ones that actually take notice of what their audience is saying. They listen and they try to deliver what they’re audience is asking for. Additionally, they actually communicate back to these individuals. They respond to messages, posts, and tweets. They even go out of the way to be the first ones to engage in conversation with some individuals in the audience. This can take the brand from just being a “thing” to something that people become engaged with and feel connected to.

Humanizing your brand can help audiences identify with the brand. They could feel like they’re a part of how the brand is developing, which can make them invest more and show loyalty. Additionally, it can be an organic way of building brand influencers and ambassadors. Use your key audience or fan members to help build your brand. Show your appreciation and support and they’ll be sure to do the same.

Branding is no longer about pushing things at people and expecting them to care. It’s about being personable and connecting with others. It’s about showing good “customer service” and appreciation. It’s about breathing life into it and making the brand seem approachable. It’s about finding a way to build some form of a relationship. What are you doing to humanize your brand?

If you enjoy topics like this, be sure to join in the discussion on Twitter: #Tchat – Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

More Links:

#Tchat Preview: Real Brands Humanize

#Tchat Recap: Face-To-Face with Brand Humanization

Photo Source

Advertisements

Getting Connected: Networking Communities

In past blog postings, I have written about topics involving social media communities and talent communities. Of course, I am very passionate about both of these types of communities but the main reason behind my feelings towards it is what these communities offer. If individuals get involved in these types of situations, many will be happy to find that the communities offer some incredible networking opportunities. Not only do they offer networking opportunities but they can also be a great resource for learning, development, and thought leadership. So, what can networking communities do for you?

Here are some potential networking communities you can explore:

  • Networking groups: Recently I discovered the website www.meetup.com. It’s a great way for people to discover specific groups who are meeting up in your area. There are plenty of groups meeting up for specific reasons, whether it is for business, certain interests, or generally just to meet people.
  • Professional clubs: professional groups that meet regularly are also a good way to network with people in different industries. For example, in Charleston, SC there is a professional club called the Charleston Young Professionals. They typically set up monthly events to allow people to have fun and also mingle for business contacts.
  • Social media: websites like Linkedin and Twitter are fantastic ways to connect with individuals. Discussion groups and chats that are based on specific professions, topics, or industries can also make it easy to casually connect with individuals.
  • Work events: surprisingly, work events can also be a great place to network. Sometimes in office settings people don’t have the time or ability to talk to people outside of their department or to individuals they don’t directly work with. This can be a great way to get to know about others in your company.
  • Conventions: conventions are a way to meet people who are in a specific industry or specific role. This will allow you to connect with people that could potentially be in the same industry/role as you. Therefore, it may be a quick way to form a bond.

Some of the benefits of networking:

  • Business connections: networking with individuals can help you find business connections that can assist you with specific business needs or business development.
  • Learning and development: networks can help open up opportunities to learn and develop. For example, social communities can present online learning, training, and development opportunities for those who want to extend their learning outside of what their company can offer.
  • Resources: networking can help you discover some really interesting resources. For example, when I was starting my blog I came across some useful reference material that helped me add something extra to my posts. It’s also a great way for people to discover job opportunities or companies that they may never have heard of.
  • Thought Leadership: networking groups can promote discussion, which can ultimately promote thought leadership. I’ve witnessed occurrences where a simple group discussion resulted in a solution that helped better a business and situation.

Since I’ve been networking in some of the ways mentioned above, I feel like I’ve developed greatly as a person. I could almost kick myself for not partaking in this sooner. The individuals I’ve met have been unbelievably inspiring and have helped pave the way to build my knowledge to grow personally and professionally. Being involved in networking communities has been one of the greatest decisions I’ve made. How about you?

Photo Source

What are Talent Communities?

In last week’s #TChat, we dug deeper to understand social communities, specifically focusing on talent communities. Of course, this is another topic that I enjoy learning more about because my background is in HR and I’m currently in a recruiting role. For those who don’t know what a talent community is, it can be simply defined as a social community that deals with social recruiting efforts. These communities open up opportunities for two-way communication between recruiters and job seekers. Talent communities can be an essential way for job seekers and recruiters to determine if there is a fit between what the company needs and what the candidate needs.

So what are some examples of talent communities? Here are some that come to mind:

  • Social media: sites like Linkedin are designed to connect professionals with other professionals. This is a great way to network, learn, and develop. It’s also a fantastic way for recruiters and job seekers to find one another and open up opportunities for communications.
  • Chats and discussion groups: once again, this can be located on social media sites such as Linkedin and Twitter. These social media sites have created discussion forums and chats that are focused on talent acquisition and human resources topics. They also open up chances for recruiters and candidates to participate in discussions so they can build potential relationships and networking opportunities.
  • Career fairs: career fairs are a great way for recruiters and job seekers to get some meet and greet time in. Career fairs are specifically designed for job opening promotion and discussion (sometimes even interviewing). Every instance involves some sort of communication in this talent community.
  • Networking events: networking groups and events are another great way to create and maintain a talent community. Individuals can meet each other in a casual way and perhaps even gain referrals for business development, expertise, and/or potential job openings (or candidates, for recruiters who are looking).

I am a strong believer in talent communities. I enjoy the social aspect of it and believe that it can be a very strong resource, both for recruiters and job seekers. These communities are created organically and maintain strong engagement because it has a central purpose that is of interest to those involved. The strongest aspect of this community is the fact that candidates can get a deeper understanding of job openings and company culture to determine if it is a fit for their personal needs and values. Additionally, recruiters can gain more insight on what candidates can offer in addition to their past work/education experience. All in all, I think talent communities create opportunities to help connect and fit the best job openings with the best candidates.

If you like topics like this, be sure to join #TChat on Twitter on Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

More Links:

The Talent Community Leader’s Sweet Spot

Talent Community Recap by Kathleen Kruse

#TChat Insights on Storify

Talent Culture

Photo Source

The Social Community for Talent Acquisition

Last Wednesday’s #TChat had once again explored one of my favorite topics: social media uses for talent acquisition needs.  With a mix of social media community managers, recruiters, human resources professionals, and job seekers- the contributions presented were amazing. Contributors shed some great light on how social media can reach a huge audience, how HR professionals have started to utilize it for their recruiting needs, and how job seekers are starting to realize that their social media presence could be a great resource for landing a job. I’m a strong believer in this because this method was one of the ways I not only found a job, but also an internship and many other fantastic opportunities to network with HR professionals. So, today’s blog will be a recap on what we discussed.

Community managers don’t just have the task of marketing to their communities but they also need to be the brand ambassadors, the personality, the customer service, the voice, and the conversationalists. Not only do they put out information but they can also learn from the customers and fans who are interested in the company and brand. They help get people engaged and stay in-the-know in real time. They create humanization and create transparency for your company culture and vision. They are the cheerleaders that spread their conviction for the brand so much, that customers/fans will pick up on the excitement and energy and also spread the word. Most importantly, they are a huge part of helping a company gain and retain customers and even potential talent.

So how can community managers help in the talent acquisition and recruiting world? Community managers not only promote the company and its products/services, it also promotes the company’s culture, vision, and why they are amazing- aka they promote themselves as being a great employer which can really pique job seekers’ interests. Some pros of social communities for talent acquisition purposes:

  • Helps job seekers learn about companies and positions
  • Helps job seekers learn about company culture to compare against their personal values
  • Helps engage potential job seekers
  • Helps job seekers have questions answered before deciding to apply
  • Reaches a larger audience of job seekers
  • Helps recruiters find candidates in an unorthodox way
  • Helps recruiters see what candidates can offer to their company
  • Helps recruiters see beyond a candidate’s resume

 

I can’t help but respect community managers because their job is jam packed with different duties. Not only do they need to market and promote the company’s products and services, but they also need to market the employer brand. They need to respond and communicate with their people to really create a solid community to gain, retain, and keep customer/fan/candidate loyalty. Additionally, they need to be the eyes and ears of the company- they have to gather intel and feedback based on what their customers and candidates are asking for. And most importantly, they must respond in a way that will keep the brand alive and well.

 

If you enjoy topics like this, be sure to participate in #TChat on Twitter- Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

More links:

#TChat Recap by Kathleen Kruse

Some Top Tweets about this topic

Talent Culture

Photo Source