Stop Being a Social Media News Feed

Recently, a friend and I were discussing some tactics to use for networking and job hunting on social media. She had informed me that she had reposted/retweeted other people’s posts and links but still was not having much luck trying to grab their attention. Although that method could potentially generate some networking and job leads, that is simply not enough. By only doing this, you are simply contributing to a news feed but no one really will know who you are or determine what you’re looking for. In order to build relationships, you need to be more interactive.

Many people have the intention to do this but don’t know where to start. Engaging in conversation with connections or strangers really isn’t as hard or terrifying as some might believe it to be. Here are some ways you can humanize your social media brand rather than act as a news feed:

  • Go beyond reposts/retweets and actually respond: nothing is wrong with reposting or retweeting someone’s update or link but you need to take the extra step and respond to their post. Even if it’s something as simple as a one-liner or follow up question, this can help start a conversation either with the poster or others viewing it.
  • Consider thought leadership: creating a well-constructed, thought provoking question is always a great way to promote thought leadership among your social media community. Research hot topics in the industry you’re interested in and post something on your networks to get people talking.
  • Discussions/Chats: Twitter chats and Linkedin discussions are always a great way to easily converse with other people, with no pressure! These discussion groups and chats usually focus on a specific topic (so be sure to join in on one relevant to what you’re targeting). It will allow you to gain contacts, discover resources, learn, and build relationships.
  • Simply reach out: you don’t always need to wait for an excuse to communicate with people- just simply reach out to them. Say hello to them, ask them about their background/work, or start with small talk. After all, these things work in person so they should also work virtually.

I’m so glad that I started utilizing these options. Since doing so, I’ve engaged in so many inspiring conversations. I was surprised to see how responsive people were and how open they were to talking. Many of my contacts have developed online and have moved on to phone or face to face relationships. I’ve gained so much from humanizing my social media feeds and have met some really smart and supportive people. They have helped me find work, build partnerships, learn, and expose me to new things. Try these things out and see how much you can gain.

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What are Talent Communities?

In last week’s #TChat, we dug deeper to understand social communities, specifically focusing on talent communities. Of course, this is another topic that I enjoy learning more about because my background is in HR and I’m currently in a recruiting role. For those who don’t know what a talent community is, it can be simply defined as a social community that deals with social recruiting efforts. These communities open up opportunities for two-way communication between recruiters and job seekers. Talent communities can be an essential way for job seekers and recruiters to determine if there is a fit between what the company needs and what the candidate needs.

So what are some examples of talent communities? Here are some that come to mind:

  • Social media: sites like Linkedin are designed to connect professionals with other professionals. This is a great way to network, learn, and develop. It’s also a fantastic way for recruiters and job seekers to find one another and open up opportunities for communications.
  • Chats and discussion groups: once again, this can be located on social media sites such as Linkedin and Twitter. These social media sites have created discussion forums and chats that are focused on talent acquisition and human resources topics. They also open up chances for recruiters and candidates to participate in discussions so they can build potential relationships and networking opportunities.
  • Career fairs: career fairs are a great way for recruiters and job seekers to get some meet and greet time in. Career fairs are specifically designed for job opening promotion and discussion (sometimes even interviewing). Every instance involves some sort of communication in this talent community.
  • Networking events: networking groups and events are another great way to create and maintain a talent community. Individuals can meet each other in a casual way and perhaps even gain referrals for business development, expertise, and/or potential job openings (or candidates, for recruiters who are looking).

I am a strong believer in talent communities. I enjoy the social aspect of it and believe that it can be a very strong resource, both for recruiters and job seekers. These communities are created organically and maintain strong engagement because it has a central purpose that is of interest to those involved. The strongest aspect of this community is the fact that candidates can get a deeper understanding of job openings and company culture to determine if it is a fit for their personal needs and values. Additionally, recruiters can gain more insight on what candidates can offer in addition to their past work/education experience. All in all, I think talent communities create opportunities to help connect and fit the best job openings with the best candidates.

If you like topics like this, be sure to join #TChat on Twitter on Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

More Links:

The Talent Community Leader’s Sweet Spot

Talent Community Recap by Kathleen Kruse

#TChat Insights on Storify

Talent Culture

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