Credit Where Credit is Due: Employee Recognition

Once again, #Tchat blew my mind last Wednesday as we discussed employee recognition.  Were managers giving too little recognition or ignoring employees? Were they giving too much that it seemed insincere? Did the recognition tap into what employees wanted and needed or did it make no difference in their engagement? There were so many questions surrounding this topic and all of the contributors provided some great input, advice, and examples.

Here are some little take-aways:

  • First off, know your employees: recognition is a great thing but it’s even greater when you know your employees will respond in the way you were intending. Each employee is different and, therefore, their needs are different. Make sure your recognition would be appreciated by them. (i.e. if someone is an introvert, don’t put them on the spot in large crowds).
  • Don’t get too crazy: we all love to be recognized for our hard work, but don’t go overboard. If you say thank you or get excited about EVERYTHING that EVERYONE does, it will start to lose its meaning. Make sure you keep it meaningful.
  • Show a little faith: sometimes companies don’t have the financial means to provide a compensation reward, and that’s perfectly fine. But there’s other ways you can reward your employees. For example, allow them to take on another project to build skills and learn. Show them you believe in their abilities to do well and have faith in them. This can go a long way.
  • Don’t shut out bad behavior: recognition doesn’t just mean positive praise. Sometimes you also need to recognize an employee for the bad, too. Don’t ignore them- help them! Ignoring these situations is just doing a disservice to them and your company. I’m sure they’d benefit from your recognition and help.
  • Keep it unique: make an effort to go beyond a generic recognition statement. Take notice of what your employees individually do for your company and show your appreciation for their unique efforts.

These little tips were just a few of the many great take-aways I gathered from the chat. You can find links below to the recap and full chat for more insight. In conclusion, remember that recognition can be a simple thing to increase morale, engagement, and efficiency. Sometimes, these things can be achieved with a simple “Thank you.”

If you enjoy topics like this, be sure to join #Tchat on Twitter, Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

More Links:

Employee Recognition Social Platform (and Photo Source): Work Simple – Contact Jocelyn Aucoin @JocelynAucoin for more details

#TChat Recap by Megan Burkett @MegBurkett

Storify of the Chat

The Buzz on Gamification

As I’ve been conducting my research to find resources for my daily blog posts, I seemed to be spotting the word “gamification” popping up more and more. I became intrigued once I saw this term trending on a more regular basis and finally decided to investigate what all the hype was about. I had figured that it had something to do with video games or gaming of the sort, so you could imagine my pleasant surprise when I learned that it was much more than that. Gamification does involve some of the structure and competitive aspects of games, but this trend is used to help increase employee and/or customer engagement. Needless to say, the topic was perfect for my post today.

In short, gamification is the concept of integrating game-like function and processes into non-gaming activities. Some common consumer examples of this would be frequent flyer miles for airlines or hotel upgrades for hotel chains. However, gamification has taken on a whole new form for human resources. Companies now use this concept as a tool for recruiting, employee engagement, recognition/rewards, and employee wellness programs. Some examples of these are as follows:

  • Recruiting: Companies have created games that are similar to Facebook’s Farmville or The Sims, but customized a structure that is relevant to the company and job function. The idea is for candidates to virtually display their abilities to multitask, perform job functions, and handle unexpected issues. Recruiters are able to see the candidates’ activity and distinguish which individuals clearly display the competency and experience needed to successfully perform the job duties. It is considered to be a virtual way to “test drive” candidates before hiring them.
  • Employee Engagement: Gamification can tap into employees’ competitive side which will increase their motivation to do certain tasks. This can also help employees be more engaged while doing boring, mind-numbing functions.  In addition to motivation, this tool can allow employees to collaborate easily and work as a team towards organizational goals. Collaboration can help employees build relationships with one another which will also increase employee engagement.
  • Recognition/Rewards: Gamification can allow managers to see which employees are putting in the effort and also determine which employees have the qualities that are worthy of reward or promotion. This can give all employees an even playing field instead of allowing the more outgoing employees to have the upper hand in catching management’s attention. On the other hand, if a company does not have the resources for monetary rewards (which can be common with the downturn of the economy), gamification can give employees awards and recognition. Even a simple thank you or virtual award can go a long way with employees.
  • Health/Wellness Programs: Gamification can be a fantastic way to get your employees on a healthier track. For example, I worked at a company where majority of employees sat through their shifts and obesity and health issues were becoming a problem. The company started a contest where employees were to set exercise goals and log their workouts on an online website for three months. At the end of the contest, the individual that lost the most weight and/or inches would win an iPad. Employees loved this contest. Even if they did not win the prize, they still felt like winners because they had now made a workout regimen routine and were seeing results.

Gamification can help make HR professionals’ jobs a lot easier and also provide some great benefits for employees. Employees will feel happier going to work, can grow professionally, prove that they’re worthy of promotion, and can even help their health. I suggest that more companies take a look at which “games” would be useful to their company and test it out. The results may be interesting!

More information on gamification:

Forbes: Gamification: Three Ways To Use Gaming For Recruiting, Training, and Health & Wellness.

Gamification Summit Videos.

Gamification.org

Employers and Brands Use Gaming to Gauge Engagement.