Stretch Projects to Increase Development and Engagement

Recently, I came across something pretty inspiring. I learned that a department manager has taken the time to learn the individual needs and passions of each of her subordinates, regardless of how insanely busy she was in her own role. She regularly takes the time to speak to them one on one to learn what their career goals are, what skills they want to develop, and address any concerns. Although that is impressive in itself, she doesn’t stop there. She takes the time to find opportunities for her employees to develop the skills in order to work their way toward their personal and professional goals. Since she started doing this, the increase in engagement has been phenomenal.

If you are a manager that’s looking to increase engagement in your workplace, consider trying this:

  • Regularly schedule one-on-one talks with your employees in an open atmosphere.
  • Make sure you talk about your employees’ career goals so you can get a feel for what they’re looking to accomplish.
  • Discuss some of the tasks and skills they would like to develop.
  • Talk to other managers in your organization to learn of different tasks or projects they’d need assistance on.
  • Discuss these opportunities with your employee to see what they’d be interested in pursuing and what would be feasible for them to do on top of their current workload.

The extra work involved in this might seem overwhelming but the benefits are worth it:

  • Employees will feel more accountable and appreciative to have a chance to develop themselves.
  • Engagement and morale will increase.
  • Turnover may decrease because employees will feel like they have professional and career growth opportunities within the organization.
  • Employees will develop skills that can help them become more of an asset to your company.
  • Departments using the employees for their projects may be more efficient with the extra help.
  • Opportunities like this can allow departments to build a stronger bond and work better, cross-departmentally.
  • Employees can gradually work their way into a role or even determine if the role or career path fulfills their passions as much as their originally had assumed.
  • It can bring in new perspective and fresh ideas.

Sometimes extra training or promotion might not be feasible in your organization due to budget, financial, and hiring issues. But, in the interim, this could be a great way to keep your employees engaged and happy while working there. It promotes continuous learning and in a way they are truly passionate about. This can create a stronger and better workforce.

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Why You Should Consider a Participative Leadership Style

Throughout my years in the working world, I’ve come into contact with many different leadership styles. Some were extremely open, some were a little more autocratic, and then some where just a complete mess of different styles mixed into one. Throughout all my different experiences, I felt that participative leadership style was one of my favorites, mainly because this leadership style seems to present a lot of benefits not only for the leader but for the employees, as well.

Participative leadership style involves many other people in the decision making process. This style opens up discussion for other participants to voice opinions, suggestions, and concerns. Most importantly, it keeps everyone in the loop. Some noteworthy benefits of this style are:

  • Everyone is given a voice: This style of leadership allows all employees (no matter what role or title) to have a voice and participate in the decision making process. Because they are involved, they will be more accepting of the decisions made because they contributed to it and were also involved in the process so they will not be blindsided by the end result.
  • It gives employees a sense of accountability: employees will know that what they say will matter and could be a vital contribution. With this in mind, employees can make suggestions or voice ideas that will be more results oriented.
  • It increases morale: employees will appreciate the fact that you are not only keeping them in-the-know about a decision or organizational change, but they’ll also be appreciative of the fact that you are including them. This appreciation and gratitude could increase employee morale and create a positive work environment.
  • It can help you learn more about your business: including employees who work in different roles, titles, or business units can allow you to get insight about some of the successes and woes of each area of your business. It can help you ensure that the decision you make will be the best because you will have a better understanding on how it will affect each business unit.

If you don’t currently use this style, I challenge you to try this out with a few of the decisions you need to make in the near future. I’m sure you will be surprised at the feedback you receive from employees. Additionally, it may help you make better choices.
Some Additional Reading:

The Advantages of Participative Leadership

5 Benefits of Participative Leadership

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