All Hail the Chief Culture Officer!

As I’ve mentioned a million times by now, I absolutely love Twitter chats. They’re an amazing source for information and also a great way to come up with some interesting topics to write about. This passed Wednesday, #TChat had a discussion about the Chief Culture Officer (CCO). Of course, this completely grabbed my attention because I love anything involving company culture and try to find other’s that are as passionate about it as I am. This chat helped shed light more on this particular role within an organization and also provided some great take-aways.

For those who are not familiar with this particular position or role, a CCO can simply be defined as the individual that focuses on cultural trends and applies them to the organization. For many years, this was considered a major missing component in maintaining a positive environment. Culture changes rapidly within an organization, so a CCO’s role is especially important in terms of keeping the organizational environment consistent throughout all of these changes, expected or unexpected.

I’m a huge cheerleader when it comes to company culture. It is important for so many reasons. Maintaining a culture is a full-time job and a company would seriously benefit from having a CCO to focus on this. Some positive reasons why having a good culture is imperative:

  • It creates trust among employees of all levels.
  • It helps employees to share and collaborate inter-departmentally and also cross-departmentally.
  • Good culture can increase productivity.
  • Can increase employee engagement.
  • It can increase employee satisfaction.
  • It can brand a company as “Best Employer to Work For” which can attract quality talent.
  • It promotes business growth and development.
  • It can reduce absenteeism and increase employee retention.

As I so eloquently said in the chat: if your culture sucks, what quality employees do you really think will stick around? Apparently, quite a few HR professionals agreed with this and consistently retweeted this sentiment. A CCO is the cultural fabric of your organization and helps the company shift seamlessly with change. Additionally, the CCO can really open up two-way communication with employees to determine what they want out of their employer to make their working experience a better one. I’m a firm believer that if you care about and invest in your employees, you’ll receive extraordinary results from them in return. What are you doing to ensure that you are their employer of choice?

Links:

TalentCulture #TChat Recap

The Rise of the CCO

The DNA Collaboration

A Job I Want Some Day: CCO

An Awesome Mashup that Justin Mass of Adobe Created of #TChat. Tweets from #TChat are spoken by Jocelyn Aucoin of WorkSimple, JD Dillion of Kaplan Higher Education, and myself.

Photo Source

If you’re interested in learning more about TalentCulture, be sure to join #TChat on Wednesday at 7PM EST

Does Your Employer Give You a Good Work-Life Balance?

With the economy’s downturn, companies have been forced to downsize and had to increase the workload of employees still on payroll. Technology and smart phones have also allowed employees to feel like they can’t “unplug” fully even during after-hours or on their days off. Factors like this are starting to blend people’s work and personal life into one. This issue has become highly noted among HR professionals because improper work-life balance has caused many people to become stressed, increased turn-over, and even caused employee’s work and home-life to suffer.

I have been guilty of working through lunch, taking work home with me over the weekend, late hours at the office, and working on holidays from home- all while being an hourly employee. Understandably, it sometimes is necessary when you have goals to meet, tight deadlines, or in my case, payroll that could not be put off. However, if workers continue this pattern it can start to take its toll on both the individual’s work performance and personal life. So why do we continue to do it?

Here are some of the top reasons employees provided when I asked them:

  • Fear that they will be terminated if they do not consistently display above-and-beyond hard work.
  • Feel that it is necessary to secure a spot for promotion when these roles are limited.
  • Do not want other workers to outshine them and make them seem like a bottom performer.
  • Technology and mobile devices make them feel like they need to give an instant response any time a phone call, text, or e-mail comes in.
  • They are given extra job duties to fill in for the individuals that were terminated/laid off and feel overwhelmed with work. They work long hours to try feel like they aren’t drowning.

I’ve had some of these similar feelings before in previous jobs. I also have witnessed other people going through this situation. Unfortunately, here are some of the effects that could occur if they keep working like this (I’ve witnessed it or co-workers have told me about it):

  • Strain on relationships: family, friends, children, and significant others.
  • Stress and depression due to not having time to unwind/relax.
  • Stress and depression due to not having time to do things the individual enjoys.
  • Anxiety about going to work and how much work will be waiting for them there.
  • In extreme cases: substance abuse has occurred to deal with stress.
  • In extreme cases: stress has caused individuals to do things that are uncharacteristic and self-destructive.
  • Feelings of resentment towards work, co-workers, and managers, which contributed to high absenteeism and turn-over.
  • Feelings of being overworked and unable to juggle life’s responsibilities.
  • Overwhelming feelings and stress affects work-performance and quality.

Unfortunately, some of these scenarios happen before an employee realizes that the lack of quality work-life balance is affecting them that much. If you are an employee feeling overworked, please review WebMD’s tips on finding a better work-life balance.  If you are an HR professional or manager, please be sure to pay attention to this to avoid any of the effects mentioned above. If you would like to find more information on companies that have the best work-life balance, please review the articles by CNN and Glassdoor. Your employees’ well-being is important!

Additional Links:

Work-Life Balance Worsened by Recession.

Recognizing Work-Life Balance Problems.

Photo Source.

 

Spotlight on PeopleMatter: Company Culture and HR Technology

A little over a year ago I started realizing that I needed to research deeper when it came to finding an ideal company that offered all (or most) of the things I wanted and valued. I was tired of submitting a resume to the same generic job posting. I hated that unsure feeling I’d get when I would interview with companies. And I really hated when I started a job and was almost instantly disappointed. With all of these thoughts floating through my head, I decided to start my employer search by simply Googling two things I loved: human resources and technology. I clicked on the first company located in Charleston, SC (where I currently reside) and my mouth instantly fell open as PeopleMatter’s webpage loaded on my screen. I was awestruck.

PeopleMatter encompassed HR and technology in a way that I could have never imagined. The technology was practical, efficient, visually appealing, and mobile. It made it easy for busy managers to manage their talent. PeopleMatter’s platform consists of the following SaaS areas:

  • Hire: The Hire platform handles all of the recruiting, tracking, and on-boarding processes from start to finish. It organizes the company’s:  applicant tracking system (ATS) functions; background checks; job assessments; tax credits; I-9s; and on-boarding paperwork and processes.  Being that I’ve worked in HR before, I’m well aware of how frustrating it can be to have multiple logins for several vendors that handle these processes. It was a relief to see that PeopleMatter found a way to take the hassle out of the on-boarding process.
  • Learn: Assigning and tracking employee training has never been easier. This learning management system allows managers to easily select and assign specific training for different job functions. Managers can upload PDFs, videos, and other training material for employees’ review. Managers can use this tool to keep track of an employee’s progress and test scores. Additionally, this system can run reports to show metrics of which training materials seem to be working and which might need to be tweaked.
  • Schedule: Scheduling is a breeze with this platform. Managers can create schedules and effortlessly share it with employees. Employees can even use the free mobile app to view schedules, request time off, and switch shifts on the go. Managers can use this system to ensure that all shifts are covered and to ensure that the company isn’t incurring unnecessary costs by double-scheduling employees. Efficient and effortless.
  • Engage: This area will be coming out soon but will be sure to grab managers’ attention. The tool will be designed to create incentive programs to help motivate and engage employees (every manager’s dream!)

But PeopleMatter’s sleek and engaging SaaS platform isn’t the only thing that caught my attention, it was also their impressive company culture. After reading about their company culture, I was sure to track their growth and development via social sites like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. As the year went on, I saw that their company was getting bigger and better in all areas. Employees generally seem to love working here. Some of the reasons why PeopleMatter’s culture rocks:

  • CEO, Nate DaPore, actually takes the time to use social media to tell the world about exciting news going on within the company, his employees, and his clients. To see a CEO of a company that is this openly invested in the business, his people, and his customers… well, there are no words. Judging by what I’ve seen, I’m sure he has an infectious passion that inspires those around him.
  • VP of San Francisco, Mark Deaton, took the time to have a phone call with me. When we ended our conversation, all I could think was, “Wow.” Mark had a management style that moved me. He talked about how he truly cares about his employees and that he has a drive to help them succeed professionally and personally. His conviction was tangible. He believes in his ability to do to good by his employees so much that he actually invited me to connect with some of them to discuss his management style. That level of confidence seems to prove that he follows through with what he says.
  • PeopleMatter involves all their employees in events to support and promote their clients, both new and old. It’s nice to see that everyone is involved in the company’s success and all the pictures seem to show that they’re having a good time.
  • PeopleMatter is random which makes the employees excited to see what’s in store for them each day they come into the office. From firing random cannons, to Mario Kart wars, to randomly doing a cross-country RV road trip- who knows what they’re going to get into next.

I wanted to put a spotlight on this company today because it does have a lot of great qualities to it. The technology is amazing and I can’t wait to see what new platforms and features they come out with in the future. Additionally, their culture is one that I can easily say that people would feel lucky to work for or with them.

Links:

PeopleMatter. 

PeopleMatter Platforms.

PeopleMatter Culture.

Twitter: @PeopleMatterHR

How Benefitfocus is Winning with Their Culture

For those of you that know me by now, you probably can tell that I really enjoy researching and writing about company/workplace culture. For whatever reason, learning about a company’s culture is a passion of mine. I find it fascinating that each company has a unique “personality” which allows their employees to either embrace or reject it, thus determining the level of success or failure a company has. I strongly believe that company culture can make or break a business. It is quite a mix: it’s delicate and needs to be handled with care, and yet it holds a certain level of power that can control the fate of a company.

First, I would like to say a big heart-felt “thank you” to a company headquartered here in Charleston, SC. Benefitfocus took notice of my love for company culture and was so kind to send me their book, “Benefitfocus: Winning with Culture”. I just received it the other day so I haven’t finished reading it yet, but it’s been inspiring so far. Their culture is very impressive and could easily give some of Silicon Valley’s top-dogs a run for their money. Companies that are struggling to find that “good cultural balance” might want to pick up a copy and take some notes. It seems to be working very well for them.

Something that did stick out at me so far was actually located in the beginning of the book. The author discussed some of the challenges that Benefitfocus faced when trying to create and maintain the culture that they have today. The company admitted that it wasn’t easy: there were days when employees were stressed out and irritated because of heavy workloads and tight deadlines; there were external factors that tried to get the company to conform to what was “normal”; and they had to find the right balance to try to make all employees as happy  and engaged as they possibly could.

Although there are many challenges, the company has managed to maintain it the best they could. I could tell they were successful in their efforts because the book had an endless amount of employee accounts in which they talk about the specific reasons of why they love the company and what qualities make them excited to come to work every day. Normally, I’d be skeptical of that many employees promoting a company brand in such a positive light. However, while going through my job hunt, I’ve had plenty of friends that work there (or have worked there) that gushed about the company. I’d have to say, you know a company is good when the employees speak highly of it even in private conversations. Reading and hearing about their stories made me smile, laugh, and actually feel a bit jealous (Yeah, so, maybe I’m a brat). Simply stated: It made an impact.

It’s situations like this that show me how important culture is. This company is notorious for celebrating, especially celebrating the individual. Because these employees feel like they’re appreciated just for being themselves, they’ve become more invested in the company. They’re committed. They’re willing to work as hard as possible. All this dedication and hard work has aided the business to grow at rapid rates. Their name and their software are becoming more well-known throughout the world. At this point, I don’t see them slowing down anytime soon. Not only is this good for business, but this PR is actually helping the company attract quality talent, as well.

I don’t normally read detailed books about specific companies, but I can easily say that I’m enjoying this so far and look forward to reading all of it. Yes, it does interest me because it deals with culture but it’s more than just that. I find it refreshing to see a company so committed to the happiness of its employees. Benefitfocus knows and understands that its employees are its greatest asset, and the company treats them as such. It’s also nice to see the conviction in the employees’ statements when they say they honestly love working there. I hope more companies consider the benefits of having a solid company culture and work on creating and/or improving theirs.

Links:

Click here to read more about their culture and watch some of their videos.

Click here to request a copy of their book.

Company Branding to Attract Talent

Today’s little blog is going to talk about the importance of company branding and marketing. Although any company would give a big huge “duh” about that fact, I’m going to focus more about branding your company to attract talent. I do believe that more companies need to focus on this type of a branding for a few reasons.

1. Savvy job seekers will spend time researching a company before applying– A good portion of job seekers are getting a little crafty in their job searches. Instead of simply going on job boards and submitting an application/resume, job seekers are taking time to do their homework. A good portion of job seekers in this economy probably have dealt with unstable work environments, bad company cultures, or lay-offs. Therefore, to avoid being in a bad situation again, job seekers will take the time to find any and all information on a company to help them get a clear idea of what the company is about.

Some companies, such as GlassDoor, make it easy for employees or candidates to post information, salary, and reviews about their past, current, or future employers. Additionally, companies have taken the extra step to post on highly visible social media sites, write blogs, or even create videos posted on YouTube. For example, some local businesses by me have posted some great videos about their culture: Benefitfocus and PeopleMatter. These two companies give great examples on how to attract future employees. Their videos are engaging, entertaining, and get you really pumped up about working for them.

2. If you brand your company well, your employees will be sure to brag about how great it is– With social media today, it’s easy for people to post about how great or awful their employer is. It’s also extremely easy for people to read these posts. For example, I saw multiple employees of the following tech companies blow up my news feed about how they’re proud to be an employee of one of the 25 best tech companies to work for in 2012. Also, LinkedIn had a video of their HQ that made people completely awestruck over how amazing it is. How did I learn about this video? LinkedIn employees started posting it stating things like, “Reasons why I love working at LinkedIn.” Soon afterwards, I saw non-LinkedIn employees posting the same video with statements like, “Why I want to work at LinkedIn.” (Totally guilty of being one of those people).

Not only will employees talk about the company, but they’re also free advertisements. How many times have you heard of Apple employees talking about how excited they were for the new i(insert product name here) coming out? Not only are they talking about it, but some may even buy the product and show others. Simply put: get your employees engaged in your company/product/service; get free marketing. Not to mention, they’d be the ultimate marketing tool because they can respond to inquiries from their friends, social media acquaintances, and family in detail and in real time.

3. You’ll attract talent and create a workforce that dominates the world– Not sure how much detail I can go into this one: if you brand it, they will come. Eventually, you’ll attract a ton of talent and have a pool of candidates ready to give their left arm to be in your company. Before you know it, you’ll be like Google and be rated a top employer for a bunch of years in a row. You could even get cool enough like them and make your company have a “verb” of itself. How would you like it if your company name became part of everyday vocabulary? I’m sure Google is loving it.

Seasoned companies and start-ups should take note of this. It would be smart for any company to invest time and resources to create a company culture that they would be happy to boast about in their branding. Employees that feel like they are working for a great company will be happy to work hard for them to ensure they stay employed there. Great candidates with exceptional talent will flock to you. The business world will be yours, at last!

Links to look at:

Employee engagement: http://www.business2community.com/strategy/the-importance-of-employee-engagement-for-high-performance-results-0144924

Benefitfocus culture: http://www.benefitfocus.com/culture/

PeopleMatter culture: http://peoplematter.com/company#article-604

25 Best Tech Companies: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-25-best-tech-companies-to-work-at-in-2012-2012-6?op=1

LinkedIn HQ video: http://www.businessinsider.com/linkedin-office-tour-2012-7?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=linkedin

Companies mentioned:

http://www.glassdoor.com
http://www.benefitfocus.com
http://www.peoplematter.com
http://www.linkedin.com
http://www.apple.com
http://www.google.com
http://www.youtube.com

Finding your Ideal Company Culture

“Company culture? What’s that?” you might ask. Simple- it is everything (or at least close enough)! Don’t make the rookie mistake of leaving this out of the equation when you’re on the hunt for your perfect job. Choosing the right company culture can make all the difference once you do get employed so take a few minutes to think about it.

Company culture can be simply defined as the beliefs, values, norms, and habits of a company. It is collective behavior shared across the organization and determines how employees of this company interact with people internally and externally. Think of it as the “personality” of the company.

So, why is this important to you?

Each individual has values that are significant to them. They have expectations and strong beliefs which ignite certain passions. To find a company that does not have values or beliefs aligned with yours could make work unfulfilling, unrewarding, and even miserable. Competitive compensation and benefit packages are lovely but what does that amount to if your heart isn’t in it or you don’t agree with how the company functions?

You spend a large portion of your life at the workplace, it is important to try and find a culture that makes you feel good all-around and makes what you’re doing feel meaningful. If you can avoid torturing yourself for 40+ hours a week, I’d suggest making an effort of considering company culture as one of the top reasons to accept or reject a job offer.

Take some time to freely and truly think about what values, passions, and beliefs you have personally. Now think of it in a business sense. Separate that list into what you WILL NOT compromise for and the things that can be negotiable. After all, you may not find the perfect culture for you but you can try to get as close as possible.

Here’s a link on some questions you can ask a potential employer to determine if a culture would be right for you: Assess Company Culture

I hope this little tid bit of info helped people consider things they never even thought of. Additionally, I would love to hear some of the cultures you loved and loathed so feel free to reach out to me!