Can HR Upgrade to 2.0?

This past Wednesday’s #TChat was quite an interesting one. Of course, I loved it because it dealt with Human Resources, technology, and keeping up with the fast-paced business changes. Apparently, though, I wasn’t the only one who found this topic thought-provoking. 340 contributors on Twitter had taken the time to participate in our hour long chat which had resulted in 2,100 tweets and 11.7 million impressions. I definitely want to say thank you to those who contributed- your offerings made the chat one of the most enjoyable ones to date. And of course, you have helped spark ideas for today’s blog posting: why HR sometimes seems to lag during fast business changes.

Can HR be agile like the rest of business? Sure they can be, but their purpose is much more complex than that and being agile could potentially prevent them from doing their proper due diligence. Human Resources are there to protect the company and also the employees. They must edit their plan of action to not only protect them presently, but also in the future. This involves careful planning. With every organizational change, HR needs to consider and update the following:

  • Job descriptions: sometimes these organizational changes can also change the roles of the employees. This means HR needs to reconsider the descriptions, duties, and expectations for these new roles.
  • Compensation Benchmarking: HR now needs to consider and compare the new roles against others in the industry. They must ensure that they are now compensating employees properly to be competitive.
  • Career path planning: HR may need to restructure some of the paths that these new roles will lead up to. After all, they wouldn’t want to create a job that ends there with no room to move upwards or laterally. That could ruin their efforts of retaining talent.
  • Performance reviews: new criterion and expectations need to be created to ensure that employees are meeting the requirements satisfactorily. This means that management and HR need to create new objectives to ensure that the role is progressing appropriately for business needs.
  • Recruitment efforts and assessments: recruiters will now need to know what the new profile and basic requirements are to help them discover the best talent. New assessments will have to be created to help recruiters determine that candidates have the appropriate skills and knowledge to perform well at the new role.
  • Employer branding: HR needs to determine what marketing and branding efforts will need to be restructured to ensure they are presenting the company in a way that is aligned with the new changes. These efforts need to be carefully thought out to appropriately attract new talent and retain current talent.

Some individuals may question why HR can’t keep up with “the speed of business”, especially with new technology emerging. Yes- technology has helped HR exponentially. However, a lot of the functions above require a “human” touch to review, plan, and consider long-term effects. HR is the department that keeps the organization and workforce ecosystem steady. Therefore, their role in organizational changes may be a little bit slower, but overall, their efforts make more of a difference than some may realize.

If you like topics like this, be sure to join #TChat on Twitter – Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

More links to this week’s chat:

HR Shifts to the Fast Lane by Kathleen Kruse

#TChat Storify by Sean Charles

5 Ways to Rock Star HR Leadership by Meghan M. Biro

Talent Culture

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