Tag Archives: @TalentCulture

Credit Where Credit is Due: Employee Recognition

Once again, #Tchat blew my mind last Wednesday as we discussed employee recognition.  Were managers giving too little recognition or ignoring employees? Were they giving too much that it seemed insincere? Did the recognition tap into what employees wanted and needed or did it make no difference in their engagement? There were so many questions surrounding this topic and all of the contributors provided some great input, advice, and examples.

Here are some little take-aways:

  • First off, know your employees: recognition is a great thing but it’s even greater when you know your employees will respond in the way you were intending. Each employee is different and, therefore, their needs are different. Make sure your recognition would be appreciated by them. (i.e. if someone is an introvert, don’t put them on the spot in large crowds).
  • Don’t get too crazy: we all love to be recognized for our hard work, but don’t go overboard. If you say thank you or get excited about EVERYTHING that EVERYONE does, it will start to lose its meaning. Make sure you keep it meaningful.
  • Show a little faith: sometimes companies don’t have the financial means to provide a compensation reward, and that’s perfectly fine. But there’s other ways you can reward your employees. For example, allow them to take on another project to build skills and learn. Show them you believe in their abilities to do well and have faith in them. This can go a long way.
  • Don’t shut out bad behavior: recognition doesn’t just mean positive praise. Sometimes you also need to recognize an employee for the bad, too. Don’t ignore them- help them! Ignoring these situations is just doing a disservice to them and your company. I’m sure they’d benefit from your recognition and help.
  • Keep it unique: make an effort to go beyond a generic recognition statement. Take notice of what your employees individually do for your company and show your appreciation for their unique efforts.

These little tips were just a few of the many great take-aways I gathered from the chat. You can find links below to the recap and full chat for more insight. In conclusion, remember that recognition can be a simple thing to increase morale, engagement, and efficiency. Sometimes, these things can be achieved with a simple “Thank you.”

If you enjoy topics like this, be sure to join #Tchat on Twitter, Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

More Links:

Employee Recognition Social Platform (and Photo Source): Work Simple – Contact Jocelyn Aucoin @JocelynAucoin for more details

#TChat Recap by Megan Burkett @MegBurkett

Storify of the Chat

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Filed under Employee Engagement, Employee Recognition

All Hail the Chief Culture Officer!

As I’ve mentioned a million times by now, I absolutely love Twitter chats. They’re an amazing source for information and also a great way to come up with some interesting topics to write about. This passed Wednesday, #TChat had a discussion about the Chief Culture Officer (CCO). Of course, this completely grabbed my attention because I love anything involving company culture and try to find other’s that are as passionate about it as I am. This chat helped shed light more on this particular role within an organization and also provided some great take-aways.

For those who are not familiar with this particular position or role, a CCO can simply be defined as the individual that focuses on cultural trends and applies them to the organization. For many years, this was considered a major missing component in maintaining a positive environment. Culture changes rapidly within an organization, so a CCO’s role is especially important in terms of keeping the organizational environment consistent throughout all of these changes, expected or unexpected.

I’m a huge cheerleader when it comes to company culture. It is important for so many reasons. Maintaining a culture is a full-time job and a company would seriously benefit from having a CCO to focus on this. Some positive reasons why having a good culture is imperative:

  • It creates trust among employees of all levels.
  • It helps employees to share and collaborate inter-departmentally and also cross-departmentally.
  • Good culture can increase productivity.
  • Can increase employee engagement.
  • It can increase employee satisfaction.
  • It can brand a company as “Best Employer to Work For” which can attract quality talent.
  • It promotes business growth and development.
  • It can reduce absenteeism and increase employee retention.

As I so eloquently said in the chat: if your culture sucks, what quality employees do you really think will stick around? Apparently, quite a few HR professionals agreed with this and consistently retweeted this sentiment. A CCO is the cultural fabric of your organization and helps the company shift seamlessly with change. Additionally, the CCO can really open up two-way communication with employees to determine what they want out of their employer to make their working experience a better one. I’m a firm believer that if you care about and invest in your employees, you’ll receive extraordinary results from them in return. What are you doing to ensure that you are their employer of choice?

Links:

TalentCulture #TChat Recap

The Rise of the CCO

The DNA Collaboration

A Job I Want Some Day: CCO

An Awesome Mashup that Justin Mass of Adobe Created of #TChat. Tweets from #TChat are spoken by Jocelyn Aucoin of WorkSimple, JD Dillion of Kaplan Higher Education, and myself.

Photo Source

If you’re interested in learning more about TalentCulture, be sure to join #TChat on Wednesday at 7PM EST

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Filed under Chief Culture Officer, Company Culture

Internal Mobility is Good for Your Company

Last night I was involved in another weekly Twitter #tchat (yes, it is my new obsession). Once again, this chat had some great contributors and some interesting information to consider. The chat’s subject discussed how companies and recruiters should focus on internal mobility for filling job openings. It seemed that a lot of the “chatters” felt strongly about this topic and believed that there were many benefits of this promotion track. The common believe was that a solid internal mobility program can be very good for your company.

Here are some informative and useful take-aways I got out of this chat:

Internal mobility can fuel employee engagement. The common theory behind this is: if you invest in your employees they are more likely to invest in you. If you want your employees to be more engaged in their work, make them feel like their contributions have a purpose. Make them know you’re taking notice of them and their efforts. Take time to discuss career goals and offer suggestions on how they can reach them. These things can put a little more pep in their step.

It can reduce turn-over. A good portion of people have admitted to leaving their employer because they felt they had no place to go. Sometimes that may be the case, but a good amount of time there are plenty of lateral or upper positions employees can move into. The issue is: employers don’t educate them on these opportunities. Make your employees aware of this to avoid losing your talent. And if you’re feeling really crazy, allow employees to create and pitch new positions that could be useful to the company (Hello, accountability!).

It can cost less to hire from within than externally. Recruiting and hiring processes are time consuming and expensive. This can be even truer if the candidate that was selected didn’t work out within the first few months. Looking at internal employees might reduce these issues. After all, these employees already know your business expectations and have met them. By now, I’m sure you’ve determined that the employee is a fit for your company. Instead of wasting time looking for diamonds in the rough, consider the gems you already have in your workforce.

Training time can be reduced. Like I mentioned above, the current employees already know your business. They know your systems. They know your managers. They know your clients. They know your mission. Basically, they know everything other than the general duties for the new position. Training them on those duties can be a piece of cake because they already have a clear understanding of how certain procedures affect the company. Think about how quick it would be to train them on those few things rather than an external hire who could take months before they completely understand the business in order to do their job well.

It can increase morale. Nothing can kill an employee’s morale more than watching a position they worked hard for be filled by some random outsider. This situation could even cause some resentment towards the newbie and the company. It is reasonable to say that not all positions can be filled internally. However, to keep the morale up, make sure you offer feedback and mentoring to those not chosen. Even if they don’t get the position, taking time to help them professionally progress can keep their positive feelings about the company intact.

It can make employees feel like they have a goal. Most employees want a job that makes them feel like they’re doing meaningful. They want to be accountable and have a sense of responsibility. However, these feelings can dwindle down if they don’t clearly see how their efforts are contributing to their professional growth. Talk to them about what they want and set a path that helps them progress towards their goal. Productivity could increase once they see how their work is directly correlated with their progression. Moreover, make sure you set realistic timelines and expectations so they don’t get discouraged if things don’t happen right away.

I know that not all job openings can be filled internally. Companies need to throw some new blood into the mix to ensure the workforce does not get stale from recycled perspectives and ideas. External people can bring something fresh into the workplace. However, your internal employees may be able to do the same if you give them a chance to prove it.

If you find this topic interesting, be sure to join in Twitter’s #tchat on Wednesday nights at 7PM EST. Additionally, leave a comment regarding this topic either on here or on the chat.

Links:
Recruiting as an Inside Job- Internal Mobility
Internal Mobility- An Inside Look at Talent

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