Tag Archives: personal values

Leaders: Find the Connection

Today’s post might be a little more about opinion than it is facts- and that’s completely fine with me because sometimes we need a little thought provoking blog post to get us all thinking. As I thought about some of the best and worst leaders I’ve dealt with over the years, I considered some of the qualities I appreciated in the leaders I truly felt strongly for. There are a few people in my life that had made me believe in them and their goals. Call me a skeptic- but this is something that’s hard to accomplish with me. And I’m sure many of you have dealt with the ups and downs caused by the economy, so there are probably plenty of you out there that are feeling the same way. So what qualities of a leader made you not have your doubts about them?

For me, it’s all about a leader that can take the time to find the connection. In my crazy and idealistic mind, I truly believe that everyone has something to relate to with someone else. Tiny things or “Hey! We’re practically twins!” things are what can really help build a relationship between others. Sometimes, leaders almost seem unattainable because of their status or how busy their schedules are that many of us never really get to know our leaders for who they are and they don’t get to know us, either. So how can we put our faith in our leaders if we feel like we’re following blindly? Will this person lead us over a cliff? And how can leaders expect to gain the allegiance of their followers if they don’t even know what their followers value?

Ok, I get it- leaders are busy but that’s no excuse for them not to make a periodic presence to help build a connection. Whether you are running a 2 person start up or a Fortune sized company, you need to make the effort. Relate to people, find the connection, and make them feel like “my leader really gets me.” I don’t care if it’s every day, once a month, or once a quarter- you need to make that effort. Unfortunately, over the last few years, the changes in the workforce have weakened loyalty among employers/employees. If the loyalty and devotion isn’t there, then how can you expect to get the best out of your workforce? Are they 100% in or are they 50% in and 50% securing other options if things go sour?

The best leaders are the ones that get involved. They’re not always the singer on the stage in front of their loving fans. They’re the ones that dive into the crowd and get in the middle of all the action. They take it all in, listen, and emerge themselves in the bigger picture.

Leaders- isn’t it time we did this together?

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How Genuine are you When Providing Endorsements/Recommendations?

In the other week’s #Tchat, we tackled the topic of endorsements and recommendations via social media. With all these new social media platforms emerging, people can easily locate and research companies and individuals for jobs, partnerships, or just generally to discuss specific things. Although technology has made it extremely easy to interact with people you wouldn’t normally run into every day, it also can have its disadvantages. For example, people can easily be whoever they desire to be online or may exaggerate some of their credentials and skills. So how can we ensure that what we see is what we get? Simple: by reviewing the public and accessible endorsements and recommendations found on their social profile.

Endorsements and recommendations can be a great way for people to verify that the person is who they claim they are and that their experience, credentials, and skills are legitimate. It’s almost like doing a pre-reference check and another source for referrals. This is all good and dandy, but most of us have noticed that sites like Linkedin are making it extremely easy for people to endorse one another. It can be a one-click free-for-all if someone’s feeling overly generous that day. For example, I have received endorsements from people who I’ve never conversed with in my life- so how can they know that I have the abilities to successfully perform the skills they endorsed me for? Don’t get me wrong, I’m thankful for the endorsements and recommendations I received, but I’m more concerned about quality over quantity.

The more that people endorse others in this way, the quicker it will reduce the accuracy and meaning of these endorsements and recommendations. And then after that occurs, we’re basically back to square one. So how can we try to limit this? By being genuine in our own recommendations. Set the bar again. If you are going to endorse someone, it would be beneficial to endorse them for things you truly know the individual has done and is capable of doing. Let it hold some weight.

But let’s even do one better- let’s also utilize the recommendation function. If you have time and honestly feel strongly about a person’s skills/work, do them (and all those reviewing their profile) a favor and write something for them. Leave a few sentences or paragraphs about your experience with them, what you learned about them, and make it thoughtfully written. Help paint a picture of their capabilities.

Remember, endorsing and recommending someone doesn’t only reflect on their reputation, but yours, as well. Make others believe in your words and trust in your opinions/suggestions by providing honest feedback. We all work so hard to be recognized for what we do, don’t let our reputations get muddied up by false endorsements.

If you enjoy topics like this, be sure to join in #Tchat on Twitter- Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

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#Tchat Recap

 

 

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Are You Embracing Diversity?

In last week’s #Tchat, we had a discussion about the importance of diversity. However, there was a bit of a twist to this chat: it wasn’t just about demographic or cultural diversity. Whenever I thought of this subject, I always considered race, sex, and so on. Needless to say, I was pretty intrigued when other members of the chat had discussed what other aspects can be considered diverse.

  • Creative diversity: don’t for a second think that creativity is only restricted to marketing, art, graphic arts, and the like. Each employee can possess a certain level of creativity in their job role that can help your business in ways that you never could have imagined. Be open to their creative suggestions- even let them experiment. Sometimes allowing new ideas to be put into play can give you results you’ve never witnessed before.
  • Educational diversity: not everyone comes from the same educational background. Perhaps some of your workforce has a degree, perhaps some do not. Maybe they went to an Ivy League college, or maybe they went to a specialized/technical/vocational school. Maybe they are the type to independently learn. Options are endless for education and this can create an educational diversity that can benefit your business.
  • Natural Talent diversity: Resumes are nice and all, but sometimes people’s natural talents aren’t presented on there. Do you unknowingly have someone who can be considered a “human connector”? Maybe someone has a knack for researching the most impossible information. Regardless of their secret skills, it’s best for you to take the time to figure out what each natural skill your employees have and see if it has a place to be utilized within the workplace.
  • Skill diversity: With the economy making employment a little bit shaky, it’s not uncommon to find employees who have worked in several jobs or within several industries, rather than committing 30 years to a single organization. These “job hoppers” actually have built some knowledge and skills that can be extremely useful to your organization.
  • Demographic diversity: Maybe an employee lived the next town over. Maybe they lived in another country. Regardless of the demographic distance, it’s important to realize that these demographics allow employees to have certain experiences, educations, skills, and knowledge that might differ. This uniqueness can help open up a company’s “eyes” to things they may never have discovered on their own.

With businesses becoming globalized and companies seeking unique talent to give them a competitive edge, it’s important for employers to realize that diversity is extremely important in helping them grow. Look beyond race and sex and realize that diversity can come in many forms. Have you recognized any of these things in your current workforce? If so, what are you doing to help nurture it?

If you’re interested in topics like this, be sure to join #Tchat on Twitter on Wednesday at 7pm EST.

More Links:

#Tchat Preview

#Tchat Recap

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Stretch Projects to Increase Development and Engagement

Recently, I came across something pretty inspiring. I learned that a department manager has taken the time to learn the individual needs and passions of each of her subordinates, regardless of how insanely busy she was in her own role. She regularly takes the time to speak to them one on one to learn what their career goals are, what skills they want to develop, and address any concerns. Although that is impressive in itself, she doesn’t stop there. She takes the time to find opportunities for her employees to develop the skills in order to work their way toward their personal and professional goals. Since she started doing this, the increase in engagement has been phenomenal.

If you are a manager that’s looking to increase engagement in your workplace, consider trying this:

  • Regularly schedule one-on-one talks with your employees in an open atmosphere.
  • Make sure you talk about your employees’ career goals so you can get a feel for what they’re looking to accomplish.
  • Discuss some of the tasks and skills they would like to develop.
  • Talk to other managers in your organization to learn of different tasks or projects they’d need assistance on.
  • Discuss these opportunities with your employee to see what they’d be interested in pursuing and what would be feasible for them to do on top of their current workload.

The extra work involved in this might seem overwhelming but the benefits are worth it:

  • Employees will feel more accountable and appreciative to have a chance to develop themselves.
  • Engagement and morale will increase.
  • Turnover may decrease because employees will feel like they have professional and career growth opportunities within the organization.
  • Employees will develop skills that can help them become more of an asset to your company.
  • Departments using the employees for their projects may be more efficient with the extra help.
  • Opportunities like this can allow departments to build a stronger bond and work better, cross-departmentally.
  • Employees can gradually work their way into a role or even determine if the role or career path fulfills their passions as much as their originally had assumed.
  • It can bring in new perspective and fresh ideas.

Sometimes extra training or promotion might not be feasible in your organization due to budget, financial, and hiring issues. But, in the interim, this could be a great way to keep your employees engaged and happy while working there. It promotes continuous learning and in a way they are truly passionate about. This can create a stronger and better workforce.

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Filed under Company Culture, Employee Engagement, Finding your Passion, Human Resources, Internal Mobility, Learning and Development, Participative Leadership Style, Professional Growth, Retaining Talent, Social Learning, Training

Taking Initiative for Your Professional Future

Being involved with Gen Y, and seeing how the economy has affected career growth and mobility for recent grads and early careerists; I can’t help but notice some of the pain points they regularly voice. One of the biggest gripes they express is the lack of room for internal mobility. Along with this, many of these individuals also feel as if though there are no opportunities for them to learn, train, shadow, or develop in a way to prove to management that they are worthy for more responsibility in their current role or that they are worthy of promotion. But for those who feel this way, it’s important to realize that just because management hasn’t presented these opportunities doesn’t mean they aren’t there. Sometimes, you need to take initiative to develop your own professional skills and opportunities.

When I’ve mentioned this to individuals, I’ve had many people respond, “Why would I put in all this time and effort if I’m not getting compensated for it? Most of the time it goes unnoticed so what’s the point?” Regardless if those things seem to initially be true, you must remember to take a step back and see the big picture. Taking initiative doesn’t just help you potentially get a raise or promotion, it helps you grow.

Each new project, task, or innovative idea you allow yourself to be a part of will give you so much and will only help you get better and better. You will gain new skills, learn how to overcome challenges more effectively, and really get an idea of what you are passionate about and good at.

Most importantly, the things you do can be a tangible part of your experience. Maybe you’ve done something relatable outside of work on a side project or hobby, but it was hard to prove to your employers that you had the experience. Taking this initiative can give you the experience in a work setting so you can put it on your resume, help build up your portfolio, and have a witness (your employer) be able to prove what you’ve done and refer you.

So, before you claim that doing something a little extra isn’t worth it, think about what you gain in the long run. You are giving yourself the ability to be attractive talent for your current or future employer. That’s the best kind of investment.

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Why Isn’t Your Company Retaining Employees?

Working in talent acquisition has allowed me to talk to multiple candidates, day in and day out. Some candidates are currently working and open to opportunities, while other candidates are unemployed for specific reasons (either voluntarily or not) and aggressively seeking. While talking to candidates, I like to take the time to ask them why they voluntarily move on from their current employer. I had always assumed that majority of the time it would have to deal with financial reasons, but I soon discovered that compensation was one of the least common reasons that were provided. Needless to say, I was interested in learning more.

Here are some of the most common reasons that I come across when inquiring about a candidate’s decision to voluntarily quit (in no particular order):

  • No room for growth: one of the most common things I come across is the fact that candidates feel like they have hit a ceiling in their current role. Candidates have expressed that management does not take the time to help them define their career path and, therefore, candidates feel like that the only way to professionally grow is to look for a company that offers them a position that fits what they’re looking to reach.
  • No training opportunities/lack of training: candidates have mentioned to me that their employers’ training programs are seriously lacking or non-existent. Many candidates expressed their desire to work for a company that was well known for their training, development, and continuous learning opportunities because it can not only set them up for success at their current role, but it can help pave the way for a better professional future.
  • Not challenged: sometimes candidates are given an unrealistic job preview and learn that the job actually lacks the challenges they had thought it would have. On the other hand, some candidates have excelled at the current role that they are in but have no opportunities to move up or take on more responsibility. Regardless of the situation, employees are feeling unmotivated which is affecting their happiness at their current role and often causes them to look for something else.
  • Feeling underappreciated: some candidates put in extra work, time, and effort but feel like it goes unnoticed. This had caused candidates to feel underappreciated and also feel like their talents are not being appropriately noticed, especially when it comes to incentive or promotion. In these cases, candidates expressed their desire to find a company that is known to have great management that takes notice of each employee’s contributions.
  • Cultural issues: in some situations, candidates were painted a picture of a certain organizational culture only to learn that the organization does not practice what they preach. In other situations, changes in the organization may have caused disruption in a strong culture. Either way, candidates felt that their company culture no longer matches their personal values and have been more focused on finding a company that is better aligned with this.

So, employers, sometimes it’s not about the compensation, perks, and bonuses. Your employees might be looking to move on from you for deeper reasons than your financial offerings. Take the time to talk to employees and find out the things they value and need in an employer. Truly understanding this can help you create an employer brand that not only attracts talent, but retains your current talent to the best of your abilities.

More links:

The Real Reasons Your Employees Are Leaving You

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Maintaining the Work-Life Balance

Have you ever worked late or on the weekends? Have you incessantly checked your phone and emails while relaxing or involved in social events? Have work-related thoughts clouded your mind and disrupted your attention outside of work? Have you stopped a conversation with a friend or family member to take a call? I know I’m definitely guilty of all of these (sometimes even simultaneously). As technology becomes more widely and regularly used, this has become a common issue in the daily lives of the employed.

Overworking yourself can actually make you LESS productive at work than taking a break to breathe and rest your mind. Additionally, it can seep into your personal life, causing issues. So how can you keep your balance? Check it out:

Set Boundaries: technology and mobile devices make it easy for you to be available non-stop. You need to set boundaries. Turn your phone on silent outside of work. Only check your emails/voicemails for an hour a night after you finish your shift. Only respond to things that NEED to be responded to.

Schedule: I literally have a white board for daily, weekly, and monthly tasks and to-dos. I work extremely hard to stick with that schedule. Having this schedule will make sure I don’t over-do it and actually reduce time worrying about whether or not I’m forgetting to do something. It saves a lot of brain power.

Prioritize: living in the instant gratification age could make it seem like if you don’t respond or aren’t present every second of the day that the world may end. It won’t- trust me. Deal with any fires that need to be put out. Then, prioritize whether or not something needs to be done ASAP or if it can be put on the backburner. Do this regularly to ensure you’re managing your time well.

Be realistic: we have become multitasking masters, which can sometimes make us believe we’re capable of doing the workload of 3 people all at once. It’s a nice thought but unrealistic. Sometimes you need to say no to people (do it nicely, though!) and if you do say yes to someone, make sure you set realistic timelines and expectations. Give yourself some extra time in case something more pressing comes up and cuts into your time. This can help you avoid the need to cram things in to meet a timeline you set.

Sometimes our lives make work and personal life blend too easily but you need to regularly take a step back and remind yourself that your brain needs a break. Do yourself a favor and follow the steps above and see if it makes a positive difference in your life.

If you like topics like this, be sure to join in #Tchat on Twitter on Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

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The Quaint Notion of the Work Life Balance

Work, Life and Peace

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