Category Archives: Company Spotlight

Make Sure Your Candidates Have a Great Experience

 

A few months ago when I was job hunting, I was applying to companies that had a well-known brand, were large, and seemed to have the culture and stability I was looking for. Naturally, I assumed that my applications would go unanswered or that a few months later I would receive a generic e-mail letting me know that they’ve gone with someone more qualified. Unfortunately, this has become the new norm for job seekers and to be quite honest, it is not a great experience. Recruiters are flooded with e-mails and alerts in their ATS systems that it can sometimes be hard to respond to candidates even with the generic e-mail. Therefore, you can imagine my surprise when I had a great candidate experience even for a position I was never interviewed for.

One of the areas I was targeting was the west coast and many of my dream companies were located out in Silicon Valley. These were top companies and majority of the time my applications and LinkedIn e-mails went unanswered. Then one night, I received a phone call from a company I applied to—Netflix. Many people are well aware of Netflix and may have even used it before. Other individuals know a ton about their company culture (I learned about it in a few classes during my college days). I seriously wasn’t expecting to hear from them, let alone receive a phone call from their recruiting department. The recruiter simply called me to let me know that they received my resume and was impressed with my experience, but didn’t have a position open matching that at the time. She also told me her e-mail address and insisted that I connect with her on LinkedIn so we can stay in-touch for any future opportunities. And that was that. A simple phone call made quite an impression.

Experiences like this can benefit a company:

  • It can increase customer referrals: Needless to say, I told many people about my enjoyable experience with them. It really meant a lot to me to have someone reach out to me even if they didn’t have anything at the time, especially a company that would have a large volume of resumes coming through. It also meant a lot that the recruiter made it easy for me to have her information and stay in touch with her. By telling others about this experience, it gave Netflix good PR. Word of mouth is amazing for marketing and advertising.
  • It can increase talent referrals:  Because this recruiter gave me her contact information, I was able to connect talented workers with her. A couple even landed interviews and offers. Also, I told these individuals my experience which made more of them eager and excited to apply to Netflix. Engaged candidates can lead to engaged employees if hired.
  • Rapport: This recruiter and company impressed me so much by this simple act that they gained my respect. This has made me want to build a rapport and relationship with the company and even help them find other talented individuals if they contact me for help. Building this rapport helps the recruiting department have mini-strategic partnerships with people they’ve spoken to.

These little things really go a long way with candidates. Finding jobs are hard and dealing with no-answers or generic answers can really wear on a candidate’s confidence. Taking that extra time to personally reach out to them can go a long way to a point where they would be extremely grateful. In turn, their gratitude could make them want to return the favor in any way they can. Positive candidate experiences are more important than businesses realize, so be sure to make the effort if you can.

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Photo Source

Netflix Website

 

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Filed under Applications, Candidate Experience, Company Culture, Company Spotlight, Recruiting, Resumes

Life at a Startup

I’ve been networking with a lot of job seekers lately who have expressed their frustrations about finding good jobs in corporate America. Some of them have considered working for startups even though they know that sometimes working with a startup could be unstable. Others have even considered starting their own. Regardless, many of them were curious to know more about life at a startup to determine if it was the right choice for them. Luckily, I have recently connected with an individual who lives in Silicon Valley and has worked in different startup environments. She was happy to provide useful information about this.

Jocelyn Aucoin, who currently works at WorkSimple in San Francisco, has been kind enough to answer the following questions about startups. Here are some details to help give a realistic idea about it:

Ashley Perez (AP): How did you get involved with startups?

Jocelyn Aucoin (JA): “A good friend of mine originally approached me about helping him out with a startup he was working with, knowing I had a background of running my own business and knowing how key an autonomous work ethic is to working at a startup.  I was immediately hooked. Startup life really feeds my love of building and creating.”

AP: What are some of the most interesting lessons you’ve learned?

JA: “I’ve learned to be just as proud of my failures as I am my successes. If I’m not pushing myself, if I’m staying comfortable, then I’m probably pretty safe, right? But if I’m working to constantly do more with what I know, challenge the status quo, and think ‘sideways’, then I’m going to fail. It’s inevitable. And I’m totally fine with that. I’d rather try and fail then never try.”

AP: What are some examples of things that go against common belief in terms of starting a startup?

JA: “I think there’s a misconception that people ‘settle’ for working at startups. This is just not true. The brightest, bravest, most creative people I’ve met in my working career are the ones working for startups. If you want to be inspired – daily – it’s where you want to be.”

AP: What are some of the challenges that startup employees face?

JA: “The biggest challenge for me personally is the extreme ebb and flow. The work pace is unpredictable and things happen fast and without warning. That means you have to be on your toes at all times, ready to go. And whereas that’s difficult in terms of planning out a week or a month, it’s a catch-22 because it’s also what keeps me from getting bored.”

AP: What are some realistic situations that employees can deal with when accepting a position with a startup (i.e. lack of benefits, lack of stability?)

JA: “Well, there aren’t always a lack of benefits. That can be the case – but not always. It depends on the type of work you’re in and the level of the startup. But yeah – it’s realistic to expect a bit of instability. Again I’d say that’s what makes it exciting. It’s a bit like walking a tightrope. It’s not for the faint of heart.”

AP: What is the difference of a startup environment vs. an established company?

JA: “Established companies typically have ways that things have been done and they require things be done in this way. Startup culture is built around innovation – and that shakes down to every level. They will generally welcome new ways of thinking and new ideas which breeds energy and creativity. You notice the difference from the moment you step foot inside a startup. You can feel energy.”

AP: What is some advice you can give to job seekers who are considering working for a start up?

JA: “Practical advice? Identify the companies where you can see yourself and start connecting with the people who work there via in any way you can. Don’t send a blind resume. Instead, say you’d like to chat and share ideas. Remember, startup culture is about collaboration and ideation. And things move fast.  Also, these places don’t have big HR systems in place, so don’t expect process to move in an overly processed way. General advice? Buckle. your. seatbelt!”

I was thankful for connecting with Jocelyn because this seems to be a hot topic out in the working world. Her answers proved that startup life can be exciting. Also, working for a startup can have an equal share of failures mixed with successes. If your personality and work ethic match some of the things Jocelyn had mentioned, I’m sure you will find your experience rewarding no matter what the outcome may be.

 More about Jocelyn: Jocelyn Aucoin is the Community and Social Media Manager at San Francisco and Minneapolis – based startup, WorkSimple. Find her at Blue Bottle Coffee or on Twitter at @jocelynaucoin.

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Filed under Alternative Workplace, Company Spotlight, Company/Candidate Fit, Future Employers, Job Seeking, Startups

Spotlight on PeopleMatter: Company Culture and HR Technology

A little over a year ago I started realizing that I needed to research deeper when it came to finding an ideal company that offered all (or most) of the things I wanted and valued. I was tired of submitting a resume to the same generic job posting. I hated that unsure feeling I’d get when I would interview with companies. And I really hated when I started a job and was almost instantly disappointed. With all of these thoughts floating through my head, I decided to start my employer search by simply Googling two things I loved: human resources and technology. I clicked on the first company located in Charleston, SC (where I currently reside) and my mouth instantly fell open as PeopleMatter’s webpage loaded on my screen. I was awestruck.

PeopleMatter encompassed HR and technology in a way that I could have never imagined. The technology was practical, efficient, visually appealing, and mobile. It made it easy for busy managers to manage their talent. PeopleMatter’s platform consists of the following SaaS areas:

  • Hire: The Hire platform handles all of the recruiting, tracking, and on-boarding processes from start to finish. It organizes the company’s:  applicant tracking system (ATS) functions; background checks; job assessments; tax credits; I-9s; and on-boarding paperwork and processes.  Being that I’ve worked in HR before, I’m well aware of how frustrating it can be to have multiple logins for several vendors that handle these processes. It was a relief to see that PeopleMatter found a way to take the hassle out of the on-boarding process.
  • Learn: Assigning and tracking employee training has never been easier. This learning management system allows managers to easily select and assign specific training for different job functions. Managers can upload PDFs, videos, and other training material for employees’ review. Managers can use this tool to keep track of an employee’s progress and test scores. Additionally, this system can run reports to show metrics of which training materials seem to be working and which might need to be tweaked.
  • Schedule: Scheduling is a breeze with this platform. Managers can create schedules and effortlessly share it with employees. Employees can even use the free mobile app to view schedules, request time off, and switch shifts on the go. Managers can use this system to ensure that all shifts are covered and to ensure that the company isn’t incurring unnecessary costs by double-scheduling employees. Efficient and effortless.
  • Engage: This area will be coming out soon but will be sure to grab managers’ attention. The tool will be designed to create incentive programs to help motivate and engage employees (every manager’s dream!)

But PeopleMatter’s sleek and engaging SaaS platform isn’t the only thing that caught my attention, it was also their impressive company culture. After reading about their company culture, I was sure to track their growth and development via social sites like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. As the year went on, I saw that their company was getting bigger and better in all areas. Employees generally seem to love working here. Some of the reasons why PeopleMatter’s culture rocks:

  • CEO, Nate DaPore, actually takes the time to use social media to tell the world about exciting news going on within the company, his employees, and his clients. To see a CEO of a company that is this openly invested in the business, his people, and his customers… well, there are no words. Judging by what I’ve seen, I’m sure he has an infectious passion that inspires those around him.
  • VP of San Francisco, Mark Deaton, took the time to have a phone call with me. When we ended our conversation, all I could think was, “Wow.” Mark had a management style that moved me. He talked about how he truly cares about his employees and that he has a drive to help them succeed professionally and personally. His conviction was tangible. He believes in his ability to do to good by his employees so much that he actually invited me to connect with some of them to discuss his management style. That level of confidence seems to prove that he follows through with what he says.
  • PeopleMatter involves all their employees in events to support and promote their clients, both new and old. It’s nice to see that everyone is involved in the company’s success and all the pictures seem to show that they’re having a good time.
  • PeopleMatter is random which makes the employees excited to see what’s in store for them each day they come into the office. From firing random cannons, to Mario Kart wars, to randomly doing a cross-country RV road trip- who knows what they’re going to get into next.

I wanted to put a spotlight on this company today because it does have a lot of great qualities to it. The technology is amazing and I can’t wait to see what new platforms and features they come out with in the future. Additionally, their culture is one that I can easily say that people would feel lucky to work for or with them.

Links:

PeopleMatter. 

PeopleMatter Platforms.

PeopleMatter Culture.

Twitter: @PeopleMatterHR

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Filed under Company Culture, Company Spotlight, HR Technology, PeopleMatter