Please Excuse My Brief Hiatus

I would like to thank you all for the support you’ve given me over the last two years. When I first started this blog, I never dreamed of the reach it could have and the opportunities it would present. As a blogger, I do believe in keeping a consistent schedule and putting out content that can teach others. As much as I like to strictly follow these rules, there are occasions where I just can’t keep it. This is one of those times.

For the last four years I’ve had the pleasure of living in Charleston, SC. It’s been quite a developmental experience for me as I ventured here on my own to learn how to grow up without the safety net of my family and friends close by. I’m thankful for the experiences I’ve had here but, as of late, I’ve felt the hunger for more and I knew that staying in Charleston wasn’t going to provide me with the things I needed to ensure my continued growth, learning and development.

Recently, an opportunity to move to Boston presented itself and within the next few days I’ll be making my way up north to start a new chapter of my life. Needless to say, it will be very busy over the next few weeks and rather than trying to keep my consistency and risk quality, I’ve decided to take a momentary pause in my blogging schedule.

Many blogs fall off the wayside if bloggers don’t make it a goal to keep a regular schedule, but I’ll assure you that this blog won’t fade away due to a brief hiatus. Once I’m settled in Boston, I’ll be sure to post regularly again. In the meantime, please excuse my break and thank you again for all of your positive support.

 

 

 

 

 

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Market Research Boosts Recruitment Strategy

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Market research is an essential step in the talent acquisition process and, surprisingly, is a step that may be inadequately implemented or missed all together. During my time in recruiting and sourcing roles, I learned how helpful market research was when starting the initial search for candidates. It’s helpful when identifying current supply and demand, challenges and opportunities. It gave me a solid starting point when pipelining candidates, making my search more efficient and effective. It’s also helped me reposition the position to be competitive.

Here are a few simple things you should review while initially performing market research:

  • Supply and demand reports: pulling these reports can provide some great insight into the talent market. Understanding how many candidates are available in comparison to posted jobs will allow a recruiter to see what they’re up against. Also, understanding average compensation, popular job titles and typical candidate profiles can allow a recruiter to reposition the verbiage if needed to ensure their job postings are more visible.
  • Competitor intelligence: in some cases, the supply and demand reports will also show top job posters in the market. This can make it easy for recruiters to see organizations that are aggressively recruiting for the same types of candidates. In researching these companies, recruiters can develop their outreach and steer conversations with candidates in a way that can highlight positives of the job and company, creating a competitive twist.
  • Pipelining: not all markets and job roles are the same, so it’s important for a recruiter to research the most popular resources to find candidates before investing in these channels. Investigate job boards, social media, career fairs, and so on to see the best places to post your job and source for talent.
  • Partnerships: building relevant partnerships in the talent market can be a great way for you to get your job in front of the right people and allow for opportunities to network with candidates. Research relevant professional organizations, universities/colleges/technical schools, veteran assistance programs, chamber of commerce associations, professional meet ups, and so on to really get a feel for these opportunities.

Although these are four simple suggestions to initially pull market research, it’s surprising how helpful this information can be. It’s allowed my job postings and networking to become more visible, thus allowing for more traffic. It was especially helpful during times I was a virtual recruiter and couldn’t physically do these things. It’s helped me get in front of relevant candidates and identify different ways to position my postings and conversations to ensure my jobs were competitive in the market. Do yourself a favor next time you get a new requisition and perform some of the steps above. I’d love to hear how it impacts your success rate.

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Why Sourcers are Crucial for Talent Acquisition

An American judge must decide who is right between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's estate and a Sherlock Holmes expert

When I first heard of sourcers, I’ll be honest, I had no idea what their purpose was. The job duties seemed similar to a recruiter and I couldn’t discern the need to divide the role into two. It wasn’t until I had the opportunity to work as a sourcer that I learned how essential they are to the talent acquisition process. After being in the industry for years, I was actually surprised more companies hadn’t used these individuals sooner. Sourcers really make an impressive impact.

Below are some top duties I performed as a sourcer. I truly believe these things are what made the recruitment process more successful than any recruitment role I had been involved in the past:

  • Support for recruiters and deep mining of candidates: Recruiters can be bombarded with a lot of tasks that take away from their ability to seek out top candidates. These tasks range from coordinating/communicating with hiring managers, managing ATS, administrative duties and so on. Although these things are essential to keep the process flowing, it prevents them from taking the necessary time to find passive candidates, post jobs in unique places, build relationships with distinct professional organizations and so on. Sourcers aren’t bogged down with all the irrelevant duties and can focus on mining for talent, which increases talent pipelines and creates better opportunities for quality candidates.
  • Market research: Just as stated before, time can be limited for recruiters. Sourcers have the ability to not only mine for talent but also to perform deep research on the talent markets. They can determine the supply vs. demand, competitor intelligence, best places to find talent and more. Having this market research can help companies reposition their strategies to be more attractive and proactive.
  • Employment branding: Of course posting to job boards is important for getting candidate applications, but sometimes recruiters are only able to have enough time to do just that. Sourcers can get creative with the job postings. For example, when I was sourcing for software developers in San Francisco, I took the time to craft postings for jobs, social media, and tech specific groups (i.e. GitHub). I would highlight interesting things about the company, teams, products and what not. It made the opportunity more “three dimensional” and helped it stand out from the typical noise.
  • Initial screening: Time is precious and we can only screen so many candidates. Unfortunately, automatically screening out candidates before speaking to them can cause companies to miss out on hidden gems. Sourcers can provide a better candidate experience by performing initial screening processes, allowing candidates to have a chance to speak to a human and not feel like their resume went into a black hole.

Although the listed tasks above might seem very basic, it really is surprising how much it can help the talent acquisition strategy. As a sourcer in the past, I believed I made a difference in the process by finding quality candidates, unique candidate referral sources, creative ways to promote the brand and jobs. I also felt like the added support to recruiters helped cut down time-to-fill, which is always a huge bonus.

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Performing with Purpose

 

When reflecting on my career progression, I recall the early years when I first started working. I relied on delegated orders, would dutifully fulfill them and wait for new assigned tasks. It was an endless cycle of repetitiveness and I often found myself on autopilot. Sometimes I even found myself disengaged when I couldn’t identify the intent of some of my responsibilities. But, being young and not feeling like I was experienced enough to have a voice, I continued performing without ever questioning it…that was a mistake.

As I’ve made my way through my career, obtained a degree and became more involved in understanding business and organizational development, I started to see that never questioning anything has done a disservice to my growth and a disservice to the betterment of the organization I was working at. Asking thought-provoking and well-structured questions won’t make anyone question your competency (as I often feared it would), but it gives you a chance to perform better. At this stage of my career, I make it a point to perform with purpose. And to do this, you have to start with one simple question – Why?

  • Asking questions: Once I started to know why certain tasks relevant, I was able to get a bigger picture. Asking what or how always helped too, but I felt the “why” was the most important thing to know. Questioning this allowed me to gain insight into the overall purpose of each function, what the expected outcome was, etc. Knowing this information not only helps you do your job better, but also sets you up to do MORE.
  • Performing better: knowing key details as to the purpose of your task and what’s the expected outcome can help drive the direction of your performance: It gives you a starting point, a path and a goal that you are aiming to meet or exceed.
  • Continuous innovation: set up time regularly to review the information you gathered from asking questions and critically analyze it. With the fast changes in business, it’s important to constantly reevaluate processes to ensure efficiency and effectiveness. Even if you aren’t in a role to implement change, your analysis and suggestions can help leadership see ways to positively impact the business.

No matter what level employee you are or how swamped you are at work, I urge you to take the time to ask questions, find ways to perform better and look for opportunities to innovate. I’d personally rather take the time to do these things and ensure every function I’m performing has a purpose than keep my head down. To help your professional growth and your organization’s growth, its things like this that can help move everything forward.

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LinkedIn Mistakes Job Seekers Make

LinkedIn Mistakes

As an active or passive job seeker, the job market can be a bit tricky. Even more so, job seeking can seem intimidating when a seeker is constantly reminded of all the things they need to do in order to stand out to a recruiter. One of the popular tools job seekers and recruiters now utilize is LinkedIn. Although this has been used for several years now, seekers who are new to the platform or haven’t used it often enough may not know the ins and outs of this social media platform, including the expected etiquette. As a recruiter, I’ve seen the painful misuse of this site which may or may not have cost candidates a job opportunity.

Yes, LinkedIn is a social media platform. Yes, it’s used to build networks and communicate. However, LinkedIn is NOT a lot of things. For example:

  • LinkedIn is not Match.com: this is by far the worst offense myself and other recruiters have experienced. LinkedIn is a site for professionals to network and shouldn’t be utilized as a primary source to find an intimate relationship or hook up. More importantly, these intentions (either sweet or inappropriately worded) should not be the first form of communication to a new connection. If you are a job seeker at a job fair, would you approach a recruiter at their booth/table and say the same things? No.
  • LinkedIn is not Facebook: LinkedIn is a fantastic way to share news, industry-related content or even promote your own content to build a personal brand. Plenty of professionals have used this well and I’ve found it to be a great source of information. However, there are a few people out there who use the “update status” section as a way to post useless information. Honestly, there are plenty of people who misuse the same feature on Facebook, but at least that site is a bit more casual in comparison to LinkedIn. If you’re a job seeker trying to get your name out there, do you think irrelevant or inappropriate posts are going to help you show prospective employers your worth?
  • LinkedIn is not Instagram: Of course, some professions are much more creative than others and LinkedIn can definitely be used to promote these portfolios. However, if you are in this type of profession or even if you’re not, there should be a limit to what you post. Much like the inappropriate dating emails or irrelevant status updates, images shared on LinkedIn should be reflective of how you’d want to present yourself to a recruiter or hiring manager. Nix the awkward selfies as your profile pictures. Try to avoid “oversharing” by posting pictures unrelated to what should be shared to your network.
  • LinkedIn is not Twitter: Twitter is a great way microblog, self-promote, network and just post a quick update. It’s not uncommon for people to post several times a day and with Twitter chats being a great way to virtually network, it’s not uncommon for people to post several times an hour. However, this elevated amount of posting should be kept exclusively to Twitter. LinkedIn’s newsfeed is already bombarded with an obscene amount of content. Limit your LinkedIn postings to a reasonable amount on a daily basis or weekly basis. You don’t want to annoy people with your over-posting to the point where they end up hiding your updates. This could seriously work against you if you ever do post any updates you want seen.

Of course, no one is perfect and there’s no perfect way to be a LinkedIn member. Even I’ve been an offender of some of these situations. Some people might like what you share, while others won’t. Some posts might work for certain professions while others don’t. The important thing is to do your homework, understand how this platform works and really research your “audience”. And always err on the side of caution. If you think your postings can work against you in your job hunt, then reconsider before you post.

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Do You Have an Effective Onboarding Program?

A strong and efficient onboarding process can make or break the engagement of your new employees. Unfortunately, the onboarding process is often overlooked. How can your company ensure it’s hitting all the key points of an effective onboarding program? Check out my recent blog post on WilsonHCG to find out more: What You Can Learn About Onboarding From the Sochi Olympics.

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Flexibility in Leadership

Lately I’ve been having a lot of interaction with a variety of leaders, ranging in experience, function and more. I was impressed to see diversity in the ways they were able to successfully perform the role and each conversation allowed me to understand the complexities a leader faces every day. Although many of their styles have differed, I did notice two traits that seemed to be common across the board. They were humanized and they were flexible.

With the evolution of the workplace, both with an increase in members from multiple generations and diversity, leaders now have to face the challenge of being able to perform leadership functions in a way that will be effective for the ranging personalities. With the variety of people found there, a leader must know how to be able to show the qualities that these people value to get buy-in. Although some people may disagree or have varying opinions, I appreciate the following traits in the leaders I’ve come across.

  • Humanization: Although some leaders are a little more open than others, I like the ones that aren’t scared to show that they aren’t perfect. I appreciate it if a leader tells me that they don’t know something 100%, asks for help, or is willing to collaborate on something. I don’t necessarily need a perfect leader but I do want someone who can admit when they’re wrong, show that they’re willing to learn and respects his/her employees enough to trust them to take ownership on a project.
  • Collaboration: Falling in line with the leaders who admit that they aren’t know-it-alls, I like it when leaders are open to working with others and/or are open to learning from one of their employees. The leaders who are willing to work together with his/her team to find a solution is one that I can have faith in.
  • Flexibility: As I said earlier, the varying personalities in an organization means that a leader has to be flexible. To be able to notice when a certain way of working with someone isn’t as effective as with someone else is key when determining the best way to lead the team as a whole and the individual members. It may take a bit extra time, but it has favorable results.
  • Ability to identify potential: Although a leader’s job is to forge forward and help the business to progress, it’s important for them to take a look back at those they are leading. Employees have potential, some are very vocal about it while others are a bit more subtle. Identifying the potential and finding ways to foster it is so important to helping the business grow.
  • Passion to develop: I know leaders are busy and don’t necessarily have the time to notice each individual person, but that needs to change. A leader won’t be there forever, so it’s important to take the time to develop their successors to feel confident that the company and the team will be left in good hands. Developing others can even help discover new areas of opportunity that may have not been uncovered otherwise.

I’ve been lucky enough to work and learn from some really great leaders. Each of them are unique and have found a way to encompass all of these characteristics in their own way. Because of it, I’ve seen employees and the organization flourish in ways that I’ve never seen at other companies. I’m looking forward to learning from them and will find ways to incorporate these qualities and others as I progress throughout my career.

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